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University of the Western Cape (2005)

Towards a tenure system for sustainable natural resource management for the communal and commonage land of the Leliefontein rural area, Namaqualand

Smit, David

Titre : Towards a tenure system for sustainable natural resource management for the communal and commonage land of the Leliefontein rural area, Namaqualand

Auteur : Smit, David

Université de soutenance : University of the Western Cape Afrique du Sud

Grade : Magister Artium – MA 2005

Résumé partiel
The aim of this research is firstly, to determine the impact of the current practiced tenure system in the Leliefontein Rural Area on the use of the natural resources and secondly, to devise and establish the most appropriate tenure system that will ensure the sustainable natural resource management on the communal and commonage land of the mentioned area. Quantitative questionnaires, review of relevant literature from documentation, research studies and reports were used to gather information and provide contextual insights. A wide spectrum from the Leliefontein Rural area specifically, Namaqualand in general and other semi-arid and communal areas in Southern Africa were covered with the gathering of the secondary data. From the study it emerges that although land conservation is practiced in the Leliefontein Rural Area the implementation thereof is not coordinated between individual farmers, rotational grazing is applied on the communal land but not on the commonage farms, the system of rotational grazing is not enforced by any institution and stock reduction is only implemented on the commonage farms. Individual farmers were identified as the most important institution responsible for land conservation. Rotational grazing is not applied on the commonage farms although it is prescribed by the Land Use Management Plans. Very significantly was the finding that farmers do not invest in the land in terms of the prevention of erosion, planting of vegetation etc. The management institution currently responsible for the administration and management of the communal and commonage land is not in a position to take action against transgressions due to a lack of financial and human resources. One of the most significant findings was that nearly half of the respondents interviewed preferred private ownership. The communal ownership of the land was identified as a major obstacle preventing investment in the land but the crucial role of communal tenure in the livelihoods of the poor was also reiterated by the findings of the study.

Mots clés : Tenure system - Namaqualand, South Africa ; Leliefontein, South Africa.

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Page publiée le 21 mars 2010, mise à jour le 5 janvier 2019