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Dalhousie University (1999)

Rights, responsibilities and benefits, a Namibian approach to community-based natural resource management

Bjarnason, David. Jan

Titre : Rights, responsibilities and benefits, a Namibian approach to community-based natural resource management

Auteur : Bjarnason, David. Jan

Université de soutenance : Dalhousie University Canada

Grade : Master of Environmental Studies 1999

Résumé
This thesis focuses on the role of community-based natural resource management for promoting sustainable resource use in Namibia The centrai role of benefits, derived from resource utilization is examined as well as how changes in property rights regimes influence peoples’ perceptions of costs and benefits, and what implications that carries for sustainable resource utilization at the local level. The aim of this work is to shed light on the role played by property rights and the embedded incentives structure, i.e. rights, benefits and responsibilities, in enhancing sustainable resource use. It also seeks to determine how these elements interact within cornmunity-based approaches to natural resource management.
The research involved a review of the relevant literature as well as fieldwork in the Kunene region in northwestern Namibia from January to April 1999. It was found that with the creation of a new policy and legislation, the Namibian CBNRM program has introduced a new common property institution in communities - nature conservancies that seem to be socially and culturally acceptable to the community members of the conservancies. The conservancy institutions enhance values of participation and equity in common property resource management of wildlife. Essentially, people see this new management regime as potentially beneficiai to them. It is evident that the common property regime established in Namibia entails more than rights to receive the benefits from the resource. The rights devolved to the community level also entail non-financial benefits which accrue to the resource user in the form of increasing community empowerment the sense of ownership over the resources, and the strengthening of their management capacities. The Namibian program represents an innovative attempt to devolve resource rights to local communities. With its distinctive characteristics. the case study in the Kunene region in Namibia provides some suggestive, through tentative lessons for community based approaches.

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Page publiée le 29 mars 2010, mise à jour le 7 février 2018