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Accueil du site → Master → Afrique du Sud → 2018 → Social grant dependence, irrigation water use and on-farm entrepreneurial spirit : a behavioural explanation for smallholders in KwaZulu-Natal.

University of KwaZulu-Natal (2018)

Social grant dependence, irrigation water use and on-farm entrepreneurial spirit : a behavioural explanation for smallholders in KwaZulu-Natal.

Zaca, Fortunate.

Titre : Social grant dependence, irrigation water use and on-farm entrepreneurial spirit : a behavioural explanation for smallholders in KwaZulu-Natal.

Auteur : Zaca, Fortunate.

Université de soutenance : University of KwaZulu-Natal

Grade : Master of Science in Agriculture (Agricultural Economics) 2018

Résumé partiel
Unemployment, poverty, hunger and inequality still remain the key rural development challenges in South Africa. Since the demise of apartheid, one of the key objectives of the South African government has been to decrease the level of poverty and improve the quality of life for all South Africans. The government, in its efforts to alleviate poverty to the disadvantaged and vulnerable segments of communities, introduced several poverty reduction strategies such as the social grants. With social grants becoming the main source of income for most rural households in South Africa, there is a concern that poor rural households are turning away from small-scale agriculture as a result of their dependence on social grants. However, there is insufficient empirical research examining the possible effects of social grants on on-farm entrepreneurial spirit of smallholders. Therefore, this study ought to fill this knowledge gap by explaining the behaviour of smallholder farmers using a revealed preference (RP) method. While other previous studies have constructed entrepreneurship and psychological capital (PsyCap) indices following the stated preference (SP) method, this study adopted the RP method to construct entrepreneurial spirit and PsyCap indices using a behavioural approach. The study was also unique compared to other studies evaluating the impact of unearned income on utilising agricultural resources at their full capacity by farmers. Most studies in the past analyse the impact of social grants and remittances on agriculture separately. Thus, pooling social grants and remittances to analyse the impact of unearned income on the proportion of land operated makes this study different compared to other studies in the past. The study was conducted in two irrigation schemes (Tugela Ferry and Bululwane) in the KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa. Both purposive and stratified random sampling techniques were applied to select the respondents in this study. The study purposively selected small-scale farmers who were involved in food crop farming to allow for comparison between different farmer typologies. A stratified random sampling method was then used to select the respondents. Smallholder farmers were categorised into four types of farmers, namely, scheme irrigators (104), homestead food gardeners (32), community food gardeners (23) and non-irrigators (16). The reason for stratification according to the farmer type was to capture the developmental paths and challenges or constraints of progressing to the next level in each farmer type. A total sample of 175 farmers, comprising of different farmer typologies, was obtained in the selected irrigation schemes.

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