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University of KwaZulu-Natal (2005)

Valuation of indirect use of benefits of woodland resources, case study : Hlabisa area, KwaZulu-Natal

Madonsela, Nqobile Vicky.

Titre : Valuation of indirect use of benefits of woodland resources, case study : Hlabisa area, KwaZulu-Natal.

Auteur : Madonsela, Nqobile Vicky.

Université de soutenance : University of KwaZulu-Natal

Grade : Master of Science 2005

Résumé partiel
Many rural households in southern Africa rely on a range of woodland resources for their livelihoods. In addition to direct use values, rural households also obtain indirect use benefits from the woodlands resources. These include ecological services such as soil protection and nutrient cycling ; and social values such as shade and aesthetic values. The value of woodland resources to rural households in southern Africa has been researched extensively. Most of these studies assess direct use values, which are expressed in monetary terms. In contrast, there are fewer studies that assess indirect use values of woodland resources, and even fewer studies that assess non-monetary values. Non-monetary valuation is important to add to the knowledge gained through monetary valuation studies. This study was undertaken as part of a national investment by the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry (DWAF) on Sustainable Woodlands Utilization and Management in the country. The aim of this study was to establish monetary and non-monetary values associated with indirect use benefits of woodland resources in three rural villages in northern KwaZulu-Natal. A pilot study was undertaken to pre-test the data collection techniques before the main survey. The Contingent Valuation Method (CVM) and Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA) were used to investigate monetary and non-monetary values during the pilot study. Data collection techniques involved interviews using semi structured questionnaires, direct observation, group discussions and resource mapping. The pilot study established that, due to its inherent properties, CVM was not the best method for this particular context (rural area in a developing country). In comparison, PRA techniques were more useful in obtaining meaningful data on the value of indirect-use benefits of woodlands.

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