Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Doctorat → Afrique du Sud → 2019 → Digging deeper for benefits : rural local governance and the livelihood and sustainability outcomes of devils claw (Harpagophytum spp.) harvesting in the Zambezi Region, Namibia

University of Cape Town (2019)

Digging deeper for benefits : rural local governance and the livelihood and sustainability outcomes of devils claw (Harpagophytum spp.) harvesting in the Zambezi Region, Namibia

Lavelle, Jessica-Jane

Titre : Digging deeper for benefits : rural local governance and the livelihood and sustainability outcomes of devils claw (Harpagophytum spp.) harvesting in the Zambezi Region, Namibia

Auteur : Lavelle, Jessica-Jane

Université de soutenance : University of Cape Town.

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 2019

Résumé partiel
Natural resource governance in Africa is characterised by increased commercialisation of natural resources, the promotion of community-based natural resource management, and a re-appropriation of traditional authorities and customary law as evidenced by their inclusion in statutory frameworks. Yet, knowledge of the interaction and effect of these multiple governance arrangements on local communities is limited. Using the lens of devil’s claw (Harpagophytum spp.), a commercial non-timber forest product, this research examines the interface between statutory, traditional and comanagement governance systems ; the broader historical and political-economic contexts that shape governance systems ; livelihood and sustainability outcomes at the local level ; and the role of power in determining environmental, social and economic outcomes. The research adopted a case study method with three study sites selected in the Zambezi Region, Namibia – Balyerwa Conservancy, Lubuta Community Forest and Sachinga. All rural communal areas, selection was based on their distinct governance arrangements, including a range of traditional and co-management institutions, development interventions and statutory regulation. Qualitative methods were used and included questionnaires, focus group discussions, interviews, participant observation and documentary evidence. An institutional mode of analysis and a political ecology approach were applied. Theoretical perspectives to inform the research were drawn from discourses on governance, institutions, political ecology, power and access. The novelty in using a political ecology approach to develop adaptive governance theory was to move beyond understandings of the conscious mechanisms of institutions embodied in their structure, to a more nuanced understanding of socially-embedded institutions and the unconscious mechanisms that also determine social and environmental outcomes.

Présentation

Version intégrale (7,6 Mb)

Page publiée le 10 janvier 2021