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Accueil du site → Doctorat → Allemagne → 2018 → Remote sensing data as a tool to monitor and mitigate natural catastrophes resulting from anthropogenic activities : case studies over land and water

Ludwig-Maximilians Universität München (2018)

Remote sensing data as a tool to monitor and mitigate natural catastrophes resulting from anthropogenic activities : case studies over land and water

Atwood, Elizabeth C.

Titre : Remote sensing data as a tool to monitor and mitigate natural catastrophes resulting from anthropogenic activities : case studies over land and water

Auteur : Atwood, Elizabeth C.

Université de soutenance : Ludwig-Maximilians Universität München

Grade : Doctor 2018

Résumé partiel
This thesis demonstrates how remotely sensed satellite acquisitions can be used to addresses some of the natural catastrophes resulting from anthropogenic activities. Examples from both land and water systems are used to illustrate the breath of this toolbox. The effects of global climate change on biological systems and the wellbeing of everyday people are becoming less easy to ignore. In addition, our oceans are facing multiple large-scale stressors, including microplastics as a recently recognized threat, which place at risk the resources which a large percentage of the world’s population depends on for their livelihood. The cause of many of these changes stem from anthropogenic activities, but lacking understanding of complex ecosystems limits our ability to make definite conclusions as to cause and effect. The difficulty to collect on-the-ground data sufficient enough to capture processes working over scales of hundred of kilometers up to the entire globe is often a limitation to research. Remote sensing systems help ameliorate this issue through providing tools to better monitor environmental changes over large areas. The examples provided in this thesis focus on (Section I) tropical peatland fire characteristics and burning in Southeast Asia as a significant contributor to greenhouse gas emissions and (Section II) spread of river-based plastic pollution in coastal ocean systems.

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