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Rhodes University (2020)

A study on reporting and learning in three natural resource management programmes in South Africa

Mushwana, Vhutshilo Mudau

Titre : A study on reporting and learning in three natural resource management programmes in South Africa

Auteur : Mushwana, Vhutshilo Mudau

Université de soutenance : Rhodes University

Grade : Master of Education (in Environmental Education) 2020

Résumé partiel
This is a case study that focuses on three Natural Resource Management programmes, namely : the Department of Environmental Affair’s Working for Water Programme, the Kruger to Canyon SANParks Biodiversity Social Projects as well as AWARD’s programme for Resilience in the Limpopo-Olifants Basin. All three programmes are being implemented in the Limpopo and Mpumalanga Provinces of South Africa. As a monitoring and evaluation officer at AWARD, I was part of the team that developed a strategy to enable learning through monitoring, evaluation and reporting, and this sparked my interest in understanding how other programmes might be approaching this. The focus of the study is on the role of reporting, as part of programme monitoring and evaluation, as a means to support learning of both programme implementers and organisations. An in-depth description of each case has been provided to enable an understanding of the overall reporting system, how reporting may play a role in supporting individual and organisational learning, and what factors enable or constrain learning in association with reporting. The research was descriptive and interpretive as the first phase of a possible extended study engaging organisations in exploring how to strengthen reporting for learning. The participants and organisations were sampled using both purposive and convenience sampling. Data was collected through 17 key informant interviews ; observations during two learning events ; and, the collection and review of numerous documents (guides, reports, templates etc.). The data was analysed through qualitative content analysis using two frameworks : Argyris’ three loops of learning (1974 ;1978) and the Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) lens (Engeström, 1987). The former was useful for bounding the types of learning to identify, and the latter for surfacing contradictions that can be explored in organisational development processes.

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Page publiée le 26 janvier 2021