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Accueil du site → Doctorat → Australie → 2015 → Optimised eucalypt domestication : an example using e. Cladocalyx, a species for low rainfall environments

Australian National University (2015)

Optimised eucalypt domestication : an example using e. Cladocalyx, a species for low rainfall environments

Bush, David James

Titre : Optimised eucalypt domestication : an example using e. Cladocalyx, a species for low rainfall environments

Auteur : Bush, David James

Université de soutenance : Australian National University

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 2015

Description partielle
Eucalyptus cladocalyx is endemic to South Australia and has been planted extensively on farmland throughout southern Australia and in dry, Mediterranean climates overseas. Its wood is hard, strong and naturally durable, making it suitable for fuelwood and solid-wood applications. Domestication in Australia commenced in 2001, when 11 provenance-progeny trials were established. The breeding objective is to maximise sawlog production per hectare per year. This thesis, presented as six chapters, examines genetic aspects of these trials that will influence the future direction of the species’ domestication program. Chapter 1 argues that traditional methods and assumptions historically used to identify selections in the first-generation breeding programs of the main commercial tree species can be improved upon in the following ways : (1) Examination of wood properties (in addition to growth and form traits) during the first generation, taking advantage of modern labour-saving techniques, rather than delaying until later generations when unidentified adverse genetic correlations between traits may be problematic. (2) Employing molecular markers to determine population genetic parameters and reconstruct pedigree and inbreeding information from families that have unknown or uncertain ancestry. (3) Using recently-developed mixed-modelling techniques that allow integration of marker-based pedigree and inbreeding information to model genotype-by-environment (GxE) interactions using large datasets. Chapter 2 examines genetic parameters including heritability of growth and wood natural durability traits and additive genetic correlations among traits

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