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Banaras Hindu University (2015)

Effect of integrated nutrients and drought mitigating practices on growth and yield of rainfed chickpea Cicer arietinum L

Dewangan,Savita

Titre : Effect of integrated nutrients and drought mitigating practices on growth and yield of rainfed chickpea Cicer arietinum L

Auteur : Dewangan,Savita

Université de soutenance : Banaras Hindu University

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 2015

Résumé partiel
India has about 85 million hectares of rainfed area which constitutes about 60% of net cultivated area. Rainfed agriculture contributes to 42% of the national food grain production. Pulses establish an unexcelled integration of Indian farming as they are the paramount source of protein in Indian diet which is predominantly vegetarian. Besides a rich source of protein, pulses are a part and parcel of sustainable agriculture, since they are responsible for improvement in physical, chemical and biological properties of soil and act as an mini nitrogen factory. India produces 17.21 million tonnes of pulses from an area of 24.78 million hectares (Nadarajan, 2013). However, about 3 million tonnes of pulses are imported annually to meet the domestic consumption requirement (Chaturvedi, et al., 2010). Pulses or grain legumes, being an important source of vegetable proteins, are easily digestible under normal condition, possess good cooking quality and also help in decreasing the blood cholesterol level as compared to animal proteins, the consumption of which causes atherosclerosis (Khanna and Gupta, 1988). Pulses containing high protein content (20-30%) are enormously utilized in covering widespread protein-calorie-malnutrition problem of the underdeveloped and developing countries including India also. Pulses play a very important in Indian agriculture both in terms of enriching soil health and for food and nutritional security of country’s ever growing population. Pulses being predominantly rainfed crop are grown in constrained and limiting factor environment, the increase in productivity had remained a major challenge for several decades. In India, chickpea is the premier pulse crop occupying 8.32 million hectares area and contributing 7.5 million tonnes to the national pulse basket with productivity of 912 kg/ha in 2011-12. Uttar Pradesh produced 0.72 million tonnes of chickpea with productivity of 1248 kg/ha in 2011-12 (Directorate of Economics and Statistics Department of Agriculture and Cooperation, 2012). About 90% of world’s chickpea is grown under rain-fed conditions and experiences terminal drought stress due to insufficient, untimely and erratic rainfall in semi-arid and arid areas, during the reproductive phase resulting in heavy yield losses accounting 3.4 million ha (Sharma, 2004–2005). Yield losses due to terminal drought range from 35 to 50% in chickpea.

Présentation et version intégrale (Shodhganga)

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