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Gulbarga University (2019)

Problems and Prospectives for Women in Agriculture A Case Study of Gulbarga District in Karnataka

Sumangala D.B

Titre : Problems and Prospectives for Women in Agriculture A Case Study of Gulbarga District in Karnataka

Auteur : Sumangala D.B

Université de soutenance : Gulbarga University

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Women’s Studies 2019

Résumé partiel
India has a predominantly agrarian economy. 70% of her population is rural ; of those households, 60% engage in agriculture as their main source of income. It has always been India’s most important economic sector. In this important agricultural sector woman plays a vital role, because it is largely a household enterprise. Women in India are major producers of food in terms of value, volume and number of hours worked. Nearly 63 percent of all economically active men are engaged in agriculture as compared to 78 per cent of women. Almost 50 percent of rural female workers are classified as agricultural labourers and 37% as cultivators. About 70 percent of farm work was performed by women. It is observed that women play a significant and crucial role in agricultural development and allied fields including, main crop production, live-stock production, horticulture, post-harvesting operations, agro/social forestry, fishing etc. ; it is a fact long taken for granted but ignored since ages. In this paper an attempt has been made (i) To study the role of women in agriculture and changes in their position at micro level, that is village level (ii) To study the gender discrimination in land, labour and wage market. The estimates for changes in the last 5-7 years show declines in employment ranging from 20 per cent to as much as 77 per cent. Employment in agriculture is thus available for fewer days per year. It is therefore becoming essential for men to migrate in search of better-paid work. Women are filling this vacuum. Women are forced to accept work in agriculture in their own village under very bad conditions because they cannot migrate as easily as men. Women agricultural workers, although they represent a big proportion of all women workers, continue to receive lower wages than men. The Ministry of labour puts the difference at 60 per cent of men’s wages, while the Indian Labour journal showed that women received 75 per cent of men’s earning

Présentation et version intégrale (Shodhganga)

Page publiée le 16 février 2021