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UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education, Delft (2019)

Optimal hydraulic model as a decision-support tool for the management of water distribution systems : A case study of Kisumu City

Oria, Joshua Owino

Titre : Optimal hydraulic model as a decision-support tool for the management of water distribution systems : A case study of Kisumu City

Auteur : Oria, Joshua Owino

Université de soutenance : UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education, Delft

Grade : Master of Science (MS) 2019

Résumé
Adequate water supply is crucial for human existence. Water distribution networks in developing countries grapple with several operational challenges. Problems such as rapid population, urbanization and migration, regulatory constraints, declining service levels and increasing demand for better service by the consumers, high costs for network rehabilitation and extensions drive the cost of treatment and distribution higher. Lack of adequate decisionsupport tools continues to impair interventions to improve service delivery. A functional and well-calibrated hydraulic model can be used as a decision-support tool (DST) to help utilities in addressing a wide range of issues besides improving hydraulic reliability. It has been observed that there has been low uptake of these DST to help in the management of the utilities due to the absence of guidelines on the data for calibration. The aim of this study was to explore the different calibration approaches available for the assessment of network performance and develop guidelines that will stimulate the use of the modelling tools available as decision–support tools. The methodology adopted in this study included the use of both manual (expert) and the automated calibration approaches, the sensitivity analyses and comparison of the results to develop the guidelines to help in the increased usage of these modern modelling tools. The study employed EPANET and WaterGEMS modelling software for manual and automated calibrations, respectively. From the simulations conducted in both manual and automated calibration approaches, the results showed great potential from both calibration approaches. The sensitivity of the modelling depended majorly on the nodal demands and the demand patterns, tank levels and the pump properties. The study established interesting conclusions. For instance, it was established that quality demand data and patterns are critical for calibration exercise and much effort must be put on collecting these datasets if confidence in the model results is to be improved. It also revealed that both the model and optimization algorithm are sensitive to the nodal demand data. The exercise, however, found out that the two approaches produce good results dependent on the modeller’s knowledge and data available

Sujets  : decision support systems hydraulic modelling water distribution systems Kenya

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Page publiée le 15 avril 2021