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Accueil du site → Master → Pays Bas → 2020 → Assessment of financial viability of solar-powered private smallholder irrigation : Case study on alluvial and conventional groundwater use in Mzingwane catchment Zimbabwe

UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education, Delft (2020)

Assessment of financial viability of solar-powered private smallholder irrigation : Case study on alluvial and conventional groundwater use in Mzingwane catchment Zimbabwe

Muhambi, Mutsa

Titre : Assessment of financial viability of solar-powered private smallholder irrigation : Case study on alluvial and conventional groundwater use in Mzingwane catchment Zimbabwe

Auteur : Muhambi, Mutsa

Université de soutenance : UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education, Delft

Grade : Master of Science (MS) 2020

Résumé partiel
Alluvial groundwater abstraction for irrigation using motorised fuel pumps in Mzingwane catchment is currently constrained by high fuel costs, frequent motorised pump services, and replacements. Solar-powered irrigation offers a climate-smart and simple alternative to resolve the issue. The research assessed the current and future financial viability of the existing private smallholder farmers that are using fuel and solar-powered irrigation from any source of water. The assessment made use of the irrigated crop gross margin analysis, cost-benefit analysis and a sensitivity analysis to changes in investment cost, crop yields, and crop prices. The study also focused on analysing the factors that influence the farmer’s decisions to invest in solar-powered irrigation, how farmers access the funds for investments and operation and maintenance, the financial and profitability status, and the circumstances for potential solar irrigation investments for farmers using alluvial groundwater. Both the fuel and solar-powered irrigation farmers funded themselves and started their small irrigation enterprises. The sources of self-funding included, cattle sales, goat sales, crop sales, provision of labour, salaries, pensions and borrowing from a local community club. Family and friend support from the neighbouring countries in the form of cash or equipment also provided a means of investment for both pumping systems. Solar-powered farmers mainly sold cattle and had other sources of income for investment while fuel-powered farmers mainly sold goats. Operation and maintenance of most fuel pumps are done locally and payments sometimes done inform of goats or crop produce. Based on the study, about 63% of fuel-powered irrigation farmers that are using alluvial groundwater are profitable.

Sujets  : groundwater smallholder irrigation financial aspects assessment Zimbabwe solar-powered irrigation

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Page publiée le 20 avril 2021