Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Master → Pays Bas → 2020 → Creating Resilient Landscapes : A social-ecological approach to uncovering decisive features in land restoration in the Sahara and Sahel

University of Amsterdam (2020)

Creating Resilient Landscapes : A social-ecological approach to uncovering decisive features in land restoration in the Sahara and Sahel

Mathews Madeline

Titre : Creating Resilient Landscapes : A social-ecological approach to uncovering decisive features in land restoration in the Sahara and Sahel

Auteur : Mathews Madeline

Université de soutenance : University of Amsterdam

Grade : Master 2020

Résumé
With increasing climatic shocks, due to macro-scale influencers such as climate change and population growth, it is ever more important that landscapes remain resilient. The Great Green Wall for the Sahara and Sahel Initiative (GGW) is an ambitious and large-scale restoration project aimed at increasing landscape resiliency. The original concept began in the 1980s with the idea of planting a broad continuous band of trees from Senegal to Djibouti. It has since been broadened to include a wide range of social and ecological activities. However, a focus on vegetation has remained central to the narrative and continued to influence project activities. This is most evident in the continued focus of activities in introducing vegetation (i.e. trees or shrubs) within the system. A focus on vegetation has led to the exclusion of other influential features that until recently have not been explored. Features which may be a key factor in shifting ecosystem states, such as the role of water within the region. In this review it is shown that a shift in policy approach is needed as GGW activities have not led to the expected outcomes of a greener, restored state, evidenced by the fact that only a handful of cited success stories can be found. Therefore, existing scientific knowledge and literature were analyzed to understand influential features within the social-ecological system of the GGW area. With the addition of two case study sites, in Senegal and Burkina Faso, to explore the possible heterogeneity within the GGW area and assess potential feature interactions at the micro-level. To address these questions a list of commonly cited decisive features was compiled, which also were reflected in the SES mapping. This review showed the inherent heterogeneity existent within the GGW area and the importance of water as an influencing feature, most evidently in land-use at the local level. In addition, the importance of decisive features such as policy emphasizing a participatory approach, informal groups, and the role of management coming from actors themselves, were found to influence the success of restoration activities. In conclusion, two major policy recommendations were made : first, being the use of land-use typologies to provide a tool for tailored policy application, so as to make room for the heterogeneity within the region. Secondly, in the adoption of a water perspective in policy with increased emphasis on soil and water conservation activities to sustain green water levels within the system.

Présentation

Version intégrale

Page publiée le 16 avril 2021