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Accueil du site → Master → Pays Bas → 2016 → Women inclusion in climate change : adaptation and mitigation : a relational approach (Ethiopian Central Rift Valley,)

University of Amsterdam (2016)

Women inclusion in climate change : adaptation and mitigation : a relational approach (Ethiopian Central Rift Valley,)

Gueye Djinda

Titre : Women inclusion in climate change : adaptation and mitigation : a relational approach (Ethiopian Central Rift Valley,)

Auteur : Gueye Djinda

Université de soutenance : University of Amsterdam

Grade : MSc. International Development Studies 2016

Résumé
Climate change is currently being experienced across all continents, but particularly in developing countries where rural populations depend on natural resources for their livelihoods. In the Ethiopian Central Rift Valley, marginalized groups, such as rural women, are especially impacted due to their lack in capacity and resources to adapt to a changing environment. Building on this empirical knowledge, the Horn of Africa Regional Environmental Center (HoAREC) in Ethiopia has identified women as a main target group of its intervention on climate change adaptation and mitigation. However, women are not solely victims of climate change, they are also key agents for transforming society and helping communities become more climate resilient. This thesis seeks to unravel women’s inclusion across the phases of this program and assesses if their needs and perspectives, as well as relationships with others and the environment have been taken into account in the identification of solutions regarding coping mechanisms in their communities. Based on accounts from program beneficiaries and staff members collected through focus group discussions, interviews and observations over a two and a half month fieldwork period, the research draws a link between gender—‐sensitivity and sustainability, exposing the implications of excluding women as participatory agents. The research takes on a relational approach that looks at interactions happening within the women’s social and environmental context. More precisely, it looks at two types of relationship : relationships between women and other stakeholders (e.g. women and male community members, women and program staff members) and those between women and objects (e.g. women and the climate change program, women and nature). Results show that not enabling women to be part of the programming phase of a program that impacts their lives and limiting their agency in this way not only furthers existing gender power imbalances, but also jeopardizes the implementation of the program. While some activities within the intervention had successful outcomes, a sustainability dimension was overlooked ; when the program came to an end, many issues followed, which could have been avoided if women had been given more responsibilities throughout the development of the program. Based on these findings related to gender-sensitivity and other aspects of the program approach, the research primarily recommends more female participation, particularly in the programming phase.

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