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Texas State University, San Marcos (2021)

Distribution Mapping and Niche Characterization of the Endemic African Storks

Gula, Jonah

Titre : Distribution Mapping and Niche Characterization of the Endemic African Storks

Auteur : Gula, Jonah

Université de soutenance : Texas State University, San Marcos

Grade : Master of Science (MS) 2021

Résumé partiel
The endemic African storks–African Openbill Anastomus lamelligerus, Abdim’s Stork Ciconia abdimii, African Woollyneck Ciconia microscelis, Saddlebill Stork Ephippiorhynchus senegalensis, Marabou Stork Leptoptilos crumeniferus, and Yellowbilled Stork Mycteria ibis–generally are poorly studied and their conservation status assessments have been created using mixed methods that are neither transparent nor replicable. Besides standardized population surveys, empirical distributions and environmental requirements are two of the most fundamental knowledge gaps that can contribute to the development of a data-driven status assessment for each species. Distribution mapping is a valuable proxy for determining population trends and range changes over time, albeit with caveats, that can provide some baseline information for assessing status. Environmental niche modeling (ENM) further contributes by estimating species-environment relationships that can be used to infer ecological needs (e.g. preferred habitats) and susceptibility to threats (e.g. climate change, land use change). Therefore, I employed both mapping and ENM to evaluate current distribution and environmental associations of African storks at two spatial scales, range-wide and regionally.

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Page publiée le 25 mai 2021