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West Texas A&M University (2019)

ENHANCING PRODUCER PROFITABILITY WITH VEGETABLE PRODUCTION IN THE TEXAS HIGH PLAINS

Boychuk, Mandi L

Titre : ENHANCING PRODUCER PROFITABILITY WITH VEGETABLE PRODUCTION IN THE TEXAS HIGH PLAINS

Auteur : Boychuk, Mandi L

Université de soutenance : West Texas A&M University

Grade : Master of Science (MS) 2019

Résumé partiel
In the Ogallala Aquifer, the Texas High Plains’ primary water source, withdrawals continue to exceed the aquifer’s limited recharge. Producers are compensating with water-conserving production techniques such as transitioning to more efficient irrigation technology, implementing conservation tillage practices, reducing the amount of irrigation applied, and alternating the crops they plant. Given the current condition of the semi-arid region, alternative production methods are necessary to enhance farm profitability. One alternative being considered by producers is the production of high-value crops. High-value crops, including vegetables, can increase overall producer profitability. Initial project experiments have demonstrated the potential for viable vegetable production ; however, no studies exist to prove the economic viability of these crops in the Texas High Plains. This study analyzes the economic feasibility of producing high-value vegetables so producers may make an informed decision regarding the incorporation of vegetable production into their existing operation. This information will benefit not only producers faced with declining water availability but also small landowners considering more productive uses of their land. Tomatoes, jalapeño peppers, and sweet corn were produced in an open field at the USDA-ARS CPRL/Texas A&M AgriLife Vegetable Production Lab in Bushland, Texas using surface drip irrigation both with and without the use of black plastic mulch. Field production data including water use, labor hours, input costs, and yields were collected through personal communication with research faculty. Additional data were collected from the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension crop budgets, the United States Department of Agriculture’s Agriculture Marketing Service, the United States Department of Agriculture’s Economic Research Service, and a review of existing vegetable production literature. These data were compiled to create enterprise budgets including revenue, variable costs, fixed costs, and total profit for each vegetable with mulch and without mulch under surface drip irrigation, on a per-acre basis.

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Page publiée le 25 mai 2021