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University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa (2020)

An evaluation of moisture management approaches for vegetative propagation of Gliricidia sepium in arid landscapes

Usinger, Travis

Titre : An evaluation of moisture management approaches for vegetative propagation of Gliricidia sepium in arid landscapes

Auteur : Usinger, Travis

Université de soutenance : University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

Grade : M.S. - Natural Resources and Environmental Management 2020

Résumé
Agricultural expansion, urbanization, commercial logging and unmanaged grazing, among other factors, have resulted in deforestation and depleted soil globally and across the Hawaiian Islands. A desirable, fast-growing nitrogen fixing tree such as Gliricidia sepium could increase the soil organic carbon in these soils and prepare the land for subsequent plantings. A common name for Gliricidia sepium is “quick stick” because of this species’ ability to easily be propagated by vegetative stakes. One of the downsides to vegetative propagation is a low rate of survival compared to seedlings in conditions with low rainfall. Moisture management practices could help to increase survival. Pretreatment of stakes, irrigation and hydrogel amendment and diameter size were examined to determine their relationship to survival and growth of gliricidia at the Plant Materials Center on the Hawaiian island of Moloka‘i. An economic analysis evaluated cost efficiency of treatment options in regards to survival and growth. Eight hundred cutting stakes were planted in a randomized complete block split-split plot design. Generalized linear mixed model analysis was used to determine differences in survival across treatments. High irrigation was the only treatment statistically significant in regard to survival (p<0.01). Split-split plot ANOVA determined no statistically significant differences across the treatment factors in terms of height. The sphagnum moss pretreatment had significantly higher number of shoots (p<0.02). The economic analysis determined that adding hydrogel cost approximately 10 percent more and adding sphagnum moss pretreatment cost 20 percent more than medium irrigation alone. Accounting for the percentage survival at 32 weeks in the respective treatments, the calculated cost per live plant was $16.30 for high irrigation, $19.53 for medium irrigation, $17.71 for medium with hydrogel and $14.83 for medium with pretreatment and hydrogel.

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Page publiée le 31 mai 2021