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Australian National University (2017)

More-Than-Water, More-Than-Human : A Transdisciplinary Sociology of Water Conflict in Central Iran

Tavakoli-Nabavi, Seyed Ehsan.

Titre : More-Than-Water, More-Than-Human : A Transdisciplinary Sociology of Water Conflict in Central Iran

Auteur : Tavakoli-Nabavi, Seyed Ehsan.

Université de soutenance  : Australian National University

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 2017

Résumé
Water conflict situations represent an intense meeting point of society and nature, particularly in terms of increasing water demand and diminishing resources. However, less tangible interactions also occur in these situations : between hydraulic infrastructure, governments, science and communities. Such connections are often left unidentified because of the assumption of the division between culture and nature and between the human and the nonhuman as separate categories.

This thesis argues the water conflicts that our current world seeks to govern—often through technical, apolitical, acultural approaches—are ‘hybridized’ in nature. They are immersed in myriad of nested networks of heterogeneous elements (e.g. humans, technologies, scientific evidence, laws, ideas, and biophysical processes), interacting together and connecting the past, present, and future. Specifically, what is understood in societies as ‘water conflict’ is the outcome of dynamic interactions that continuously form and reform the conflict situation, and determine the social and political orders surrounding it.

The thesis argues that we can and should go beyond singular disciplinary viewpoints to unpack this ‘water conflict assemblage’. To this end, it proposes a transdisciplinary frame of analysis, called Actor-Network-Systems (ANSs). The thesis offers a new way to reconceptualise water conflict, including the well-established notion of ‘hydrohegemony’, and ‘hydropolitics’ more generally.

The theoretical shift is brought about in two ways : first, by revisiting the meaning and implication of the ‘political’, and the ‘social’ in water research through considering the role of nonhumans ; second, by establishing the connection between ‘conflict’ and ‘the future’ and the ways in which it affects the ‘sustainability’ discourse circulated in society.

Présentation (ProQuest)

Page publiée le 17 juin 2021