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Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 1996 → Subjective landscapes and resource management on the Chinese grasslands of Inner Mongolia

Columbia University (1996)

Subjective landscapes and resource management on the Chinese grasslands of Inner Mongolia

Williams, Dee Mack.

Titre : Subjective landscapes and resource management on the Chinese grasslands of Inner Mongolia

Auteur : Williams, Dee Mack.

Université de soutenance  : Columbia University

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 1996

Résumé
Since Chinese officials first authorized decollectivization and land privatization, an unfamiliar and disruptive spatial order has increasingly spread across pastoral areas of Inner Mongolia. Recent fieldwork conducted among ethnic Mongols in a township of Chifeng City Prefecture reveals that barbed wire fences are dramatically reshaping the ecological environment and redefining access to community resources. These changes in the structure of local space exacerbate problems of land degradation and intensify economic disparities among independent herding households, setting off a chain of transformation across both the physical and social landscape. This dissertation presents an ethnographic report from a village that has been at the forefront of the expanding household enclosure movement since 1980. It documents in detail some of the obvious and more subtle changes that have occurred. It argues that the recent proliferation of fence-wire and the changes that ensue are intimately related to a national modernization project that directly links local residents to an encroaching capitalist world system. It further argues that local landscape transformation, and the specific phenomenon of land degradation, cannot be fully understood apart from the cultural context of group identity and environmental symbolism. Ideologically informed spatial and ecological perceptions prove to be highly relevant in shaping and contesting both national rangeland policies and the local practices of daily land use. Evidence is presented that social forces at global, regional, and local levels all contribute to the acute state of environmental reconstruction now underway on the northern grasslands.

Présentation (ProQuest)

Page publiée le 29 mai 2021