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Accueil du site → Doctorat → Allemagne → 2019 → Analyzing global typologies of socio-ecological vulnerability the cases of human security in drylands, and rapid coastal urbanization

University of Potsdam (2019)

Analyzing global typologies of socio-ecological vulnerability the cases of human security in drylands, and rapid coastal urbanization

Sterzel Till

Titre : Analyzing global typologies of socio-ecological vulnerability the cases of human security in drylands, and rapid coastal urbanization

Auteur : Sterzel Till

Université de soutenance  : University of Potsdam

Grade : Doctor of Natural Sciences “doctor rerum naturalium” (Dr. rer. nat.) in Geoecology 2019

Résumé partiel
On a planetary scale human populations need to adapt to both socio-economic and environmental problems amidst rapid global change. This holds true for coupled human-environment (socioecological) systems in rural and urban settings alike. Two examples are drylands and urban coasts. Such socio-ecological systems have a global distribution. Therefore, advancing the knowledge base for identifying socio-ecological adaptation needs with local vulnerability assessments alone is infeasible : The systems cover vast areas, while funding, time, and human resources for local assessments are limited. They are lacking in low an middle-income countries (LICs and MICs) in particular. But places in a specific socio-ecological system are not only unique and complex – they also exhibit similarities. A global patchwork of local rural drylands vulnerability assessments of human populations to socio-ecological and environmental problems has already been reduced to a limited number of problem structures, which typically cause vulnerability. However, the question arises whether this is also possible in urban socio-ecological systems. The question also arises whether these typologies provide added value in research beyond global change. Finally, the methodology employed for drylands needs refining and standardizing to increase its uptake in the scientific community. In this dissertation, I set out to fill these three gaps in research. The geographical focus in my dissertation is on LICs and MICs, which generally have lower capacities to adapt, and greater adaptation needs, regarding rapid global change. Using a spatially explicit indicator-based methodology, I combine geospatial and clustering methods to identify typical configurations of key factors in case studies causing vulnerability to human populations in two specific socio-ecological systems. Then I use statistical and analytical methods to interpret and appraise both the typical configurations and the global typologies they constitute.

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