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Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 1991 → The invisible variable : Development policy, agriculture and the role of women in the Sahelian region of Africa

University of Delaware. (1991)

The invisible variable : Development policy, agriculture and the role of women in the Sahelian region of Africa

Morandy Nostrakis, Anny.

Titre : The invisible variable : Development policy, agriculture and the role of women in the Sahelian region of Africa

Auteur : Morandy Nostrakis, Anny.

Université de soutenance  : University of Delaware.

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 1991

Résumé
Despite her enormous contribution to subsistence agricultural production in West Africa, the Sahelian woman has remained largely ignored in development policy and project implementation. This dissertation examines the extent of such neglect and its impact on Sahelian development, and identifies policy options for the future. The theoretical framework of dominant Western models of agricultural development overlooks women and their well-being. Only the peripheral evolution of the field of women in development (WID), coupled with the basic needs and self-reliance perspectives within development theory, lay the groundwork for policy formulations which are gender blind. This thesis systematically brings together and assesses the aggregate effects of the ideology and application of Neoclassical development theory, Sahelian governmental dynamics and agricultural policy, the sociocultural environment of women, and the policies and programs of international organizations that have responded to the food crises in the Sahel. Research from WID is synthesized to detail the socioeconomic and cultural context of the Sahelian woman and to draw the strong link between her agricultural role and food production. Her condition is subsequently used as a benchmark to measure the ways in which agricultural policies undertaken in the Sahel have, by undermining her economic status and perpetuating her subordinate position, decreased food production and increased dependency and environmental deterioration. The exploitation of the rural sector by Sahelian national governments, an exploitation fostered by major international donors during the years 1973-1985, is detailed to demonstrate this. The potential of indigenous multinational regional organizations and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), both indigenous and international, as mechanisms to further gender equality and agricultural productivity is then assessed. The thesis concludes that agricultural self-reliance should be prioritized in order to overcome the current food crisis. This goal cannot be reached, however, without attending to the Sahelian woman’s role in agriculture and eliminating the gender inequities in the rural sector. Although the promotion of regional cooperation is a fruitful policy option, the alternative holding greatest promise is the functional linkage between Northern and Southern NGOs. Such linkage would, on the Southern side, further the best use of indigenous resources and, on the Northern side, help counteract traditional impediments to women’s full participation in development.

Présentation (ProQuest)

Page publiée le 9 juin 2021