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University of Basel (2017)

Spatial analysis of diarrhoea and environmental risk factors in an urban context in Senegal, West Africa

Thiam, Sokhna

Titre : Spatial analysis of diarrhoea and environmental risk factors in an urban context in Senegal, West Africa

Auteur : Thiam, Sokhna

Université de soutenance  : University of Basel

Grade : Doctoral Thesis, 2017

Résumé partiel
Diarrhoeal diseases continue to be a major public health concern globally, associated with high childhood mortality and morbidity, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Although the number of deaths due to diarrhoea decreased considerably over the past 25 years, morbidity has declined only moderately. In 2015, diarrhoea was responsible for nearly half a million deaths (9%) among children under the age of 5 years. Most of the diarrhoea-related deaths were attributable to unsafe water, inadequate sanitation and lack of hygiene. In 2015, an estimated, 844 million and 2.3 billion people around the world still lack access to basic drinking water service and sanitation facilities, respectively, mainly in LMICs, and particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. In Senegal, diarrhoea is the leading cause of childhood deaths and about 14% of the burdens, as expressed by of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), were due to diarrhoeal diseases in children below the age of 5 years. While diarrhoea is among the leading infectious diseases, most studies were conducted in capital cities or rural areas, while little information is available for “secondary cities” so-called “medium-sized cities”. Secondary cities in many African countries, including Senegal, are faced with a lack of epidemiological data at small scale (e.g. neighbourhood level) : prevalence and incidence, aetiologies and exposure factors. Data at small scale, as well as spatially and explicit assessment of disease risk like diarrhoea are lacking in secondary cities for effective guidance and planning of interventions. Against this background, data at small scale are needed in such urban settings to establish the local epidemiology and implement appropriate preventive measures. To address this research gap, the work undertaken in the current PhD thesis was conducted in a context of secondary cities, characterized by rapid urbanization, where control of infectious diseases, including diarrhoea, is a challenge.

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