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Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 2016 → Giving, Taking, and Sharing : Reproducing Economic Moralities and Social Hierarchies in Transnational Senegal

Northwestern University (2016)

Giving, Taking, and Sharing : Reproducing Economic Moralities and Social Hierarchies in Transnational Senegal

Yount-André, Chelsie.

Titre : Giving, Taking, and Sharing : Reproducing Economic Moralities and Social Hierarchies in Transnational Senegal

Donner, prendre et partager : Reproduire les "moralites economiques" et les hierarchies sociales dans le Senegal transnational.

Auteur : Yount-André, Chelsie.

Université de soutenance  : Northwestern university cotutelle École des hautes études en sciences sociales (Paris)

Grade : Doctorat : Anthropologie sociale et ethnologie : Evanston, Northwestern University : 2016

Résumé
This dissertation asks how deepening global inequalities reshape the ways families nagotiate "economic moralities", normative expectations of material obligation and entitlement. It focuses on the families of middle class migrants : French-educated Senegalese urbanites whose diplomas no longer protect them from discrimination in Paris but who, among Africans, are still construed as high-status, potential patrons. I examine the ways transnatioal families manage diverse moral priorities in their struggle to maintain status in multiple communities, each of which places demands on their limited resources. Drawing on 18 months (2014-2015) of linguistic and ethnographic data from Senegalese households in Paris and Dakar, I analyze how talk about exchanges serves to categorize and rank people and their rights to resources in kinship networks and state systems alike. This dissertation approaches the values that shape material exchange in a novel way ; through examination of everyday acts of storytelling and food sharing. It foregrounds the role of children in negotiating economic moralities, attending to the moral stances family members voice in household talk. I theorize how people repond to multiple, sometimes contradictory economic moralities in their daily lives, examining values as located in explicit pronouncements of virtue and tacitly communicated through talk evaluating and explaining acts of giving, talking and sharing. I argue that economic moralities are inherently political, demonstrating how family discussions reproduce social distinction and selective solidarity, creating nested hierarchies of belonging in france and transnational kinship networks alik

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Page publiée le 12 juin 2021