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UKAID Department for International Development (R4D) 2001

Finger millet blast in East Africa : Pathogen diversity and disease management strategies

Millet Disease East AFrica

UKAID Department for International Development (R4D)

Titre : Finger millet blast in East Africa : Pathogen diversity and disease management strategies

Pays : Kenya, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania

Projet de recherche pour le Développement :

DFID Programme : Crop Protection

Organismes de mise en œuvre  : Lead Institutes : Department of Applied Plant Science, Queen’s University of Belfast ; Horticulture Research International ; Queen’s University of Belfast

Durée : Start Date : 01-04-2001 — End Date : 30-11-2004

Objectifs  : To understand the genetic and pathogenic diversity of the finger millet blast populations in Uganda and Kenya to develop sustainable disease management strategies.

Descriptif
There is a large demand for finger millet in East Africa, which is produced in the lake region countries of Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, and Rwanda, among others. In Uganda, finger millet is second only to maize as a major cereal crop, and occupies more than 400,000 ha/a (500,000 t grain). The most affected part is classified as semi-arid hillside systems, including the Teso area. Northern region accounts for 40% of the national production, followed by the Eastern region with 21%. In Kenya, 65,000 ha/a are planted in the Western, Nyanza and Eastern provinces. Blast caused by Magnaporthe grisea (anamorph Pyricularia grisea) has been identified as the highest priority constraint to finger millet production in East Africa, by the recent NARO needs-assessment exercise. Most of the finger millet land-races, and a number of other genotypes are highly susceptible to blast. In Uganda and Kenya, yield loss due to damage by blast and grassy weeds (potential ,green bridges,of blast pathogen) are a priority for intervention, as regards poor communal farmers. In particular, neck and head blast inhibit grain formation/cause shrivelling of grains, and in extreme cases yield losses up to 90% can result. Very little information is available on the pathogen diversity and epidemiology from the region. Knowledge on the disease intervention points and identification of varietal resistance is vital, to develop sustainable disease management strategies and fully exploit the potential of finger millet - a culturally important, subsistence/food security crop that is rich in minerals.

Total Cost to DFID : £302,222

Présentation : Recherche for Development (R4D)

Page publiée le 4 juillet 2021