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Native desert bighorn sheep in ecologically intact areas are less vulnerable to climate change

ScienceDaily (August 26, 2020 )

Titre : Native desert bighorn sheep in ecologically intact areas are less vulnerable to climate change

ScienceDaily (August 26, 2020 )

Résumé
In the American Southwest, native desert bighorn sheep populations found in landscapes with minimal human disturbance, including several national parks, are less likely to be vulnerable to climate change, according to a new study led by Oregon State University.

Descriptif
The researchers found that the least vulnerable bighorn populations are primarily in and around Death Valley National Park and Grand Canyon National Park. The results suggest that protecting these landscapes should be a priority for native bighorn conservation, said lead author Tyler Creech, an OSU graduate now at the Center for Large Landscape Conservation in Bozeman, Montana.

Meanwhile, the researchers determined that the populations with the highest overall vulnerability are primarily located outside of national park units in the southern Mojave Desert and in southeastern Utah.

In the study, the researchers analyzed the genetic structure and diversity of bighorn sheep populations and how connected they are to other populations, both genetically and geographically, and used that information to infer their vulnerability to a changing climate.

Story Source  : Oregon State University

Annonce (ScienceDaily)

Annonce (Phys.org/news)

Page publiée le 22 juin 2021, mise à jour le 24 juin 2021