Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Brèves → Brèves 2020 → NASA-Qatar OASIS Project Aims to Find Buried Water in Earth’s Deserts

NASA-Qatar OASIS Project Aims to Find Buried Water in Earth’s Deserts

SciTechDaily (SEPTEMBER 24, 2020) }

Titre : NASA-Qatar OASIS Project Aims to Find Buried Water in Earth’s Deserts

Researchers will design a mission to learn about underground aquifers in areas such as the Sahara and how climate change will affect them in the future.

SciTechDaily (SEPTEMBER 24, 2020)

Présentation
Earth’s driest ecosystems are a study in extremes : They can be blazingly hot stretches of sand like the Sahara Desert or shatteringly cold expanses of ice such as those in Greenland and Antarctica. These arid regions receive very little annual precipitation, and the effects of climate change in these ecosystems are poorly understood. A joint effort between NASA and the Qatar Foundation aims to address that — and, in the process, help communities that are being impacted by those changes.

Researchers with the Orbiting Arid Subsurfaces and Ice Sheet Sounder (OASIS) study project are designing a satellite mission to probe the sand dunes and ice sheets of some of Earth’s driest places with radar technology similar to that used by NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). The project’s primary goal would be to discover and monitor underground sources of fresh water called aquifers. Many aquifers in the deserts of North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, among others, are being rapidly depleted to support the needs of local communities.

At the same time, aquifers in coastal regions are being threatened by sea level rise caused by the melting of ice sheets in places like Greenland. If the saltwater from rising seas contaminates the fresh water in aquifers, it would affect not only drinking water but also regional agriculture and food security. A secondary goal of the project is to gain a better understanding of how melting ice sheets contribute to rising seas.

Source  : JET PROPULSION LABORATORY

Annonce (SciTechDaily)

Page publiée le 3 juillet 2021