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Accueil du site → Doctorat → Australie → 2020 → Faunal community structure and predator relationships in Uluru Kata Tjuta National Park, central Australia

University of Sydney (2020)

Faunal community structure and predator relationships in Uluru Kata Tjuta National Park, central Australia

Bennison, Kerrie Anne

Titre : Faunal community structure and predator relationships in Uluru Kata Tjuta National Park, central Australia

Auteur : Bennison, Kerrie Anne

Université de soutenance : University of Sydney

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 2020

Résumé
This thesis focuses on the main habitat types at Uluur-Kata Tjuta National Park (UKTNP), in central Australia, and examines how and why native species are distributed throughout the system. ’Top down’ and ’bottom up’ processes are examined, with a spotlight on the role of predation in driving the dynamics of the vertebrate community and the subsequent effects on the diversity, abundance and distribution of native prey. Over the course of nine chapters and using a combination of long term historical, and contemporary data, this study examines the diversity of fauna contained within the different areas of UKTNP and which species play particular roles in defining fauna assemblages. A range of inputs into a typical desert system, informed by the literature review of Chapter Two, are examined for their effect on fauna including rainfall, fire, the role of the apex predator, the influence of the apex predator on smaller predators, the structure of the vegetation community and the food resources available. Conclusions and management recommendations are contained within the final section of the thesis.

Mots clés : Uluru Kata Tjuta desert fauna cat spinifex

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Page publiée le 4 novembre 2021