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Accueil du site → Doctorat → Allemagne → 2019 → Development of participatory water management strategies for peri-urban low-income areas – A socio-hydrogeological case study in Jaipur, India

Freie Universität Berlin (2019)

Development of participatory water management strategies for peri-urban low-income areas – A socio-hydrogeological case study in Jaipur, India

Frommen, Theresa

Titre : Development of participatory water management strategies for peri-urban low-income areas – A socio-hydrogeological case study in Jaipur, India

Entwicklung partizipativer Wassermanagementstrategien für peri-urbane Armengegenden – Eine sozio-hydrogeologische Fallstudie in Jaipur, Indien

Auteur : Frommen, Theresa

Université de soutenance : Freie Universität Berlin

Grade : Doctor rerum naturalium (Dr. rer. nat.) 2019

Résumé partiel
The dissertation was part of the project “Women’s Action towards Climate Resilience for Urban Poor in South Asia” under the lead of the Indian NGO Mahila Housing SEWA Trust. The pro-ject took place in the frame of the Global Resilience Partnership funded by Rockefeller Founda-tion, USAID and SIDA for a two-year period (2016-2018). The Hydrogeology Group from Freie Universität Berlin focused on Jaipur, the capital of Rajasthan in Northwest India, and was respon-sible for socio-hydrogeological investigations. Two low-income communities in the peri-urban fringe of Jaipur without sufficient water supply both in quality and quantity were selected as pilot areas for socio-hydrogeological studies. They represent two different typical geological settings in Jaipur and their water problems are representative of many low-income areas throughout the country. They also differ significantly from each other in terms of social aspects being a Hindu community on the one hand (Khara Kuaa) and a Muslim community on the other hand (Nai Ki Thari). The main research question was how to establish participatory groundwater management in these areas together with local women groups. The research was therefore structured into two parts. Next to the participatory work, which was executed with women from both communities, the hy-drogeology of the two study areas was investigated to understand the groundwater-related prob-lems occurring in peri-urban poor areas in detail and to develop scientific sound solution strate-gies adapted to local conditions. The two main aquifers of the area, the overlying Quaternary alluvium (up to 100 m thick) and the deeper Proterozoic fractured hard rock aquifer show both anthropogenic and geogenic impacts which decrease groundwater quality and quantity. In general, the groundwater of both aquifers is not potable, due to high TDS values above the permissible limit of 500 mg/L given in the Indian Standard for drinking water and/or high nitrate values above the permissible limit of 45 mg/L. Declining water tables due to over abstraction put further stress on the intensively used ground-water resource. Significant differences exist between Khara Kuaa and Nai Ki Thari in terms of water supply. In Khara Kuaa, about two thirds depend on the municipal water line (surface water mixed with groundwater) followed by >25 % ordering private tanker (groundwater), while in Nai Ki Thari the main supply source is private tanker (groundwater) followed by 30 % using wells (groundwa-ter). In general, the water supply infrastructure is characterized by a large number of privately organized legal and illegal components which poses a challenge both for consumers and responsi-ble authorities. The poorer the household, the higher the cost of drinking water and the more time it takes to fetch it, while wealthier households can draw water freely and “unlimited” or are con-nected to public water supply.

Mots clés  : interdisciplinarity groundwater participatory approach

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