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Universität Osnabrück (2020)

Shaping Transboundary Water Governance - How Learning Spaces Shape Transboundary River Basin Management Practices and Processes in the Omo-Turkana and Zambezi River Basins

Lumosi, Caroline Kang’ahi

Titre : Shaping Transboundary Water Governance - How Learning Spaces Shape Transboundary River Basin Management Practices and Processes in the Omo-Turkana and Zambezi River Basins

Auteur : Lumosi, Caroline Kang’ahi

Université de soutenance : Universität Osnabrück

Grade : Dr. ret. nat 2020

Résumé
This doctoral dissertation provides conceptual contributions to understanding and analysing transboundary river basin management practices and processes. The conceptual framework of this thesis is embedded in the social learning literature. This thesis builds on prior efforts by scholars (see Keen et al., 2005 ; Muro & Jeffrey, 2008 ; Newig et al., 2010 ; Pahl-Wostl, 2009 ; Reed et al., 2010 ; Schusler et al., 2003) to evaluate and analyze social learning processes. In particular, the concept of learning space as used in this thesis contributes to a deeper understanding of the context in which social learning occurs by combining an analysis of interactions, deliberations and reframing processes. Three research gaps are identified and addressed in this dissertation. First, conceptualisation and evaluation of social learning in emergent processes. Second, an analysis of how relational features (such as trust and shared identities) impact on social learning outcomes. Third, the lack in understanding of how contextual features (such as frames) shape social learning processes and influence transboundary river basin management practices. To address these gaps, this thesis employed case study approach of two transboundary river basins ; the Omo-Turkana and Zambezi river basins in Africa. The two case studies fit a better understanding of transboundary river basin management processes and practices as both river basins are shared by different riparian states with competing interests. This thesis explores the general research question : How do learning spaces shape transboundary river basin management practices and processes ? This thesis found that the success of transboundary basin cooperation lies not only in actors solving technical problems but also hugely relates to how actors interact with one another to build the needed capacity to address technical issues. As such, creating trust and shared identities, as well as paying attention to problem framing plays a considerable role in defining how actors learn. Overall, by incorporating concepts such as trust, shared identity and frames into the concept of learning space, this thesis was able to provide a better understanding of transboundary river basin management practices. Such a perspective could provide a deeper understanding of how management practices and institutions can be better designed.

Mots clés  : Social learning ; Transboundary water governance ; Omo-Turkana basin ; Zambezi basin ; Learning spaces

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Page publiée le 23 novembre 2021