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United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2021

ASSESSING SOIL AND PLANT HEALTH RESPONSE TO COMPOSTED AND SOLARIZED GRAPE POMACE WITH MANURE IN SEMI-ARID SOIL

Soil Plant Health Soil

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture

Titre : ASSESSING SOIL AND PLANT HEALTH RESPONSE TO COMPOSTED AND SOLARIZED GRAPE POMACE WITH MANURE IN SEMI-ARID SOIL

Identification : 1027148

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : START : 01 SEP 2021 TERM : 31 AUG 2024

Résumé
According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) census data, certified organic farms in Arizona stayed identical in 2012 and 2017. Still, sales increased from $54,503,000 to $97,956,000, respectively (80% increase in sales), indicating high demands for organic products by Arizonans. While misconception is an issue about organic certification pricing with limited knowledge among farmers, in 2012 and 2017, 33% and 43% of the organic producers reported production as the main challenge. Arizona soils are predominantly calcareous (high above 7.5) with deficient organic matter, affecting soil nutrient cycling and availability within these irrigated desert soils, especially during the organic transition with limited alternatives for alkaline soil pH, fertility, and plant health management. Combining grape pomace (GP)) from the rapidly growing wine industries with poultry and horse manure could fill the production. Wine production in Arizona significantly increased from 65,413 gallons (2007) to 297,145 gallons (2017), with an estimated 354% increase in GP production, which unfortunately ends up in landfills. The GP has low pH (3.2 to 3.9), with 2% N, 0.5% P, 2% K, and 2% Ca per ton, making it an excellent alternative alkaline soil. Adding 5% GP to semi-arid calcareous soil reduced soil pH from 8.1 to 5.9, increased maize and wheat growth and nutrition while adding 40% poultry manure improved GP compost minerals and reduced composting time. The project proposed field application of GP to assess soil and plant health and economic profitability compared to poultry and horse manure through farmer participatory research and extension program.

Objectifs
To reduce Verde Valley wineries by-products (grape pomace (GP)) as environmental waste by 100% in Arizona and instead promote it as soil and plant health enhancement alternative in semi-arid croplands in the USA and worldwide.Objectives:1. To assess the effects of composted grape pomace (CPG) and solarize grape pomace (SPG) with manure (poultry and horse) on soil health (pH, salinity, nutrient availability, organic matter, aggregate stability, water-holding capacity, water infiltration, and microbial respiration) and plant nutrient uptake efficiencies for the selected vegetable crops(carrot and spinach).2. To assess the effects of CPG and SPG combined with manure (poultry and horse) on the plant rhizosphere and phyllosphere microbial community diversity and population structure.3. To compare the economic viability and profitability of CPG and solarize SPG with manure (poultry and horse), focusing on cost, carbon credit, and crop yield.4. To promote the use of organic amendment as sustainable, regenerative agriculture soil amendment practices using extension programs and outreach with field demonstrations and field days, conference presentations, and publications.

Financement total : $575,000

Performing Institution : UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA
Investigator : Mpanga, I. ; Brown, JU, K.. ; Tronstad, RU, . ; Blankinship, JO, .

Présentation : USDA (NIFA)

Page publiée le 1er décembre 2021