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Accueil du site → Projets de développement → Projets de recherche pour le Développement → 2020 → CLIMATE CHANGE AND FUEL WOOD HARVESTING IMPACT ON PINYON AND JUNIPER : PATTERNS OF CHANGE AND METHODS FOR RE-ESTABLISHMENT

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2020

CLIMATE CHANGE AND FUEL WOOD HARVESTING IMPACT ON PINYON AND JUNIPER : PATTERNS OF CHANGE AND METHODS FOR RE-ESTABLISHMENT

Climate Fuelwood Pinyon Juniper

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture

Titre : CLIMATE CHANGE AND FUEL WOOD HARVESTING IMPACT ON PINYON AND JUNIPER : PATTERNS OF CHANGE AND METHODS FOR RE-ESTABLISHMENT

Identification : 1023330

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : START : 15 JUN 2020 TERM : 14 JUN 2023

Résumé
Pinyon pines are a culturally and ecologically important species across much of the southwestern US including the Navajo Nation. They have experienced widespread mortality due to recent drought in the region, and active mitigation, such as restoration planting, may be required to maintain trees in areas they have historically occupied. Our previous work on pinyon pine suggests that specific trees and populations may be better suited to future conditions. At the same time, seed production is increasingly limited by heat and aridity, thus there is a time sensitive need to collect, store and test pinyon pine seed for re-planting. Though juniper is more drought tolerant than pinyon pine, recently mortality rates are increasing for this species as well. There is also concern that both pinyon and juniper loss to fuelwood cutting on the Navajo Nation may be accelerating with the loss of coal mining operations. Thus, it is crucial and time sensitive to understand the current status and future trends for pinyon juniper woodlands and to develop restoration resources and techniques.OBJECTIVES:We will use remote sensing and ground-based survey plots to understand the extent of pinyon-juniper, its loss, and its potential for regeneration.We will collect and store seed from many sites to ensure the availability of seeds for future restoration.We will develop techniques for germination, growth, and inoculation with beneficial soil microbes so that trees can be replaced where they have been lost.These objectives will be addressed through a collaboration between NTU, NAU, Navajo Nation agencies and the United States Forest Service. The latter will share Forest Inventory and Analysis data and expertise in remote sensing and modeling plant distributions. NTU students will be trained in forest survey methods, as well as, in remote sensing data and geographic information systems analyses. The eventual goal is to map current and predict future pinyon juniper woodland distribution and to develop methods, resources, and plans for restoration. This project is primarily based at Navajo Technical University where faculty and students will be advised and trained by faculty and staff from Northern Arizona University and by Dr. Sam Cushman of the United States Forest Service. A previous USDA award to NTU established an experimental forest and restoration test which will be used in this program. Nine NTU students will receive training as interns and more will be trained during coursework.

Financement total : $498,342

Performing Institution : NAVAJO TECHNICAL COLLEGE
Investigator : Chischilly, S.

Présentation : USDA (NIFA)

Page publiée le 27 novembre 2021