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United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2021

COMMUNITY-INTERACTION EFFECTS ON ROOT WATER UPTAKE AND USE IN GREAT-BASIN RANGELANDS

Root Water Great-Basin

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Institute of Food and Agriculture

Titre : COMMUNITY-INTERACTION EFFECTS ON ROOT WATER UPTAKE AND USE IN GREAT-BASIN RANGELANDS

Identification : 1026307

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : START : 04 MAY 2021 TERM : 30 JUN 2023

Objectifs
In this proposed study, I will test how by-species root water uptake depths are influenced by the uptake depths of neighboring vegetation,quantify the effects of community root-water-uptake-depth composition on plot-level use of soil water, andquantify the effects of community root-water-uptake-depth composition on plant physiological status.The primary objective of this study to determine how separation in root-water uptake niches among coexisting plants affects water availability to them, their relative use of water, and their relatively efficiency in using water.Task 1 : Quantify by-species water uptake patterns and evaluate their relationship with the identities of other species in their communityTask 2 : Quantify plot-scale water use and how it relates to the rooting strategies of individuals present in each plotTask 3 : Estimate leaf carbon assimilation rates and water status by species and assess how these metrics of physiological status relate to community water uptake and use patterns.These three tasks will be conducted in low, mid, and high elevation zones of an experimental rangeland. Within each elevation zone, there are four different treatment levels that are associated with different species compositions. Measurements will be made at five periods throughout the growing season, which will used both independently and in characterizing growing-season-integrated patterns.This study will advance our basic understanding of how plant belowground competition for water affects their aboveground functions. Moreover, it will quantify the potential magnitudes of carbon- and water-balance uncertainties that can be introduced into hydrological models that neglect community-level effects on plant functional traits. Lastly, these anticipated process-level insights will aid in predicting how regionally important disturbances factors or management decisions might affect two important natural resource issues related to soil water availability : groundwater recharge and vulnerability to cheat-grass invasion.

Performing Institution : UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA
Investigator : Allen, SC.

Présentation : USDA (NIFA)

Page publiée le 1er décembre 2021