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United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2016

Maximizing Long-term Soil Productivity and Dryland Cropping Efficiency for Low Precipitation Environments

Soil Productivity Crop Drylands

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS)

Titre : Maximizing Long-term Soil Productivity and Dryland Cropping Efficiency for Low Precipitation Environments

Identification : 2074-11120-004-00-D

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : Start Date : Oct 1, 2016 // End Date : Sep 30, 2021

Location : Columbia Plateau Conservation Research Center : Pendleton, OR

Objectifs
Objective 1 : Develop and deliver reduced- or zero-tillage management practices to maintain surface residues and improve water use efficiency that are adapted to specific low-precipitation dryland wheat growing regions and soils. • Subobjective 1A : Determine if differences in surface soil water and organic matter between no-till wheat–fallow and minimum tillage wheat–fallow are likely to produce a long-term advantage for one system over the other. • Subobjective 1B : Test the effect of delayed minimum tillage on seed-zone water in a very dry region in order to recommend an optimum timing. Objective 2 : Develop management practices to increase soil organic matter and associated C and nutrients, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, reduce soil acidification, and maximize long-term soil productivity. • Subobjective 2A : Measure soil organic C and soil organic N stock changes, and carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide and methane fluxes to determine the C and N footprint for six dryland cropping systems, and render this information useful to growers, industry representatives, and policy makers. • Subobjective 2B : Project soil organic C stocks in diverse agroecosystems after changes in tillage and cropping system using the process-based C model CQESTR and climate data. Objective 3 : Determine water flux through the soil profile and the potential for N loss in current and proposed cropping systems to determine how to improve the efficient use of water and N through the wheat-root zone in specific dryland growing regions. • Subobjective 3A : Compare water storage, water use efficiency, and nitrate leaching between various winter wheat–fallow systems in a low-precipitation zone. • Subobjective 3B : Quantify the relationship between applied N and N uptake, use efficiency, and grain yield in long-term experiments to develop and apply this information in determining optimum fertilization rates for dryland, no-till winter wheat production.

Présentation : USDA (ARS)

Page publiée le 30 novembre 2021