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United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2016

Genomics and Phenomics to Identify Yield and Drought Tolerance Alleles for Improvement of Camelina as a Biofuel Crop

Camelina Biofuel Drought

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS)

Titre : Genomics and Phenomics to Identify Yield and Drought Tolerance Alleles for Improvement of Camelina as a Biofuel Crop

Identification : 2020-21410-007-03-A

Pays : Etats Unis

Durée : Start Date : Oct 1, 2016 // End Date : May 31, 2021

Location : Plant Physiology and Genetics Research : Maricopa, AZ

Objectifs
Sustainable, alternative fuels represent a promising solution to help reduce carbon emissions, expand domestic energy sources, contribute to price and supply stability, and stimulate economic development in rural communities. The success of biofuels lies in finding inexpensive feedstocks that do not compete with food crops and can be cultivated economically in diverse geographical regions and agricultural production systems. These alternative sources must be renewable, with positive social, economic, and environmental performance. Camelina (Camelina sativa) is an old world crop newly introduced to the semiarid west of the United States. Camelina is lower yielding than canola (food oil crop), but more compatible with shorter production cycles (60-90 days) that have potential for springsown crop rotations. The crop also grows fairly well in marginal lands, with low inputs, and has a high oil content ( 35%). The overall goal of this project is to discover useful gene/alleles controlling seed yield and oil content and quality for biofuels under sustainable agricultural systems and characterize novel germplasm with enhanced oilseed feedstock characteristics to develop newly adapted, high-yielding cultivars for these systems. The objectives of the work are to 1) Develop automated, non-destructive high-throughput phenotyping (HTP) protocols to evaluate genetic diversity accession panels of camelina ; 2) Discover alleles/genes controlling morphological, physiological, seed, and oil yield properties using genome-wide association studies (GWAS) ; and 3) Test selected germplasm under diverse environments and marginal production areas to identify regionally adapted cultivars.

Présentation : USDA (ARS)

Page publiée le 30 novembre 2021