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NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION (NSF) 2021

Development of multiple-scale sensor and remote sensing technology to quantify abiotic carbon dioxide emission in irrigated soils of aridlands

Sensor Remote-Sensing CO2 Irrigation Aridlands

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

Titre : Development of multiple-scale sensor and remote sensing technology to quantify abiotic carbon dioxide emission in irrigated soils of aridlands

Organismes NSF : CBET Div Of Chem, Bioeng, Env, & Transp Sys

Durée : January 1, 2021 // December 31, 2024 (Estimated)

Résumé partiel
Arid lands cover more than 40% of the terrestrial land surface and host more than two billion people. To produce more food and support a growing population, intensive irrigation is being utilized worldwide to convert arid lands to agricultural fields. However, intensive irrigation of arid lands causes several problems including high water loss through evaporation, salt accumulation, and the formation of calcite mineral deposits, which can clog soil pores and change water-infiltration patterns. Moreover, formation of these calcite minerals is coupled with the release of carbon dioxide (CO2) that could alter regional and global carbon balances. The overarching goal of this project is to advance our fundamental understanding of the release of calcite-derived CO2 from arid agricultural soils using an irrigated pecan orchard in the El Paso region along the Rio Grande valley as a test site. To achieve this goal, the investigators propose to quantify the emission of calcite-derived CO2 from their pecan orchard test site using a suite of measurement tools including portable CO2 isotope analyzers, eddy covariance towers and remote sensing systems mounted on an unmanned aerial vehicle. The successful completion of this project will benefit society through the collection of new data and the development of new fundamental knowledge on how much abiotic CO2 is released to the atmosphere when arid lands are converted to irrigated agricultural fields. Further benefits to society will be achieved through student education and training, and public outreach including the mentoring four graduate students (2 PhD and 2 MS), and 3 undergraduate students at UTEP and a postdoctoral scholar at TAMU.

Partenaire (s) : Saurav Kumar (Principal Investigator) Girisha Ganjegunte (Co-Principal Investigator) Zhuping Sheng (Former Co-Principal Investigator)

Bureau de recherche parrainé  : Texas A&M AgriLife Research 400 Harvey Mitchell Pkwy S College Station

Financement : $598,496.00

National Science Foundation

Page publiée le 26 novembre 2021