Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Doctorat → États-Unis → 2021 → ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL AND ANTHROPOGENIC FACTORS AFFECTING GIRAFFE SURVIVAL IN EAST AFRICA

Michigan State University (2021)

ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL AND ANTHROPOGENIC FACTORS AFFECTING GIRAFFE SURVIVAL IN EAST AFRICA

Muneza, Arthur Bienvenu

Titre : ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL AND ANTHROPOGENIC FACTORS AFFECTING GIRAFFE SURVIVAL IN EAST AFRICA

Auteur : Muneza, Arthur Bienvenu

Etablissement de soutenance : Michigan State University

Grade : Fisheries and Wildlife – Doctor of Philosophy 2021

Résumé partiel
Giraffe (Giraffa spp.) populations have declined by approximately 35% in the last 30 years, with extinctions documented in seven African countries. This decline has been attributed primarily to ecological and anthropogenic factors. In this dissertation, I assessed the impact that disease and human-interactions with wildlife have had on giraffe populations. In Chapter One, I quantified the severity of a skin disease that manifests as crusty, greyish-brown lesions, and has been recorded in at least seven countries. I positioned my study in Tanzania, which has some of the highest rates of giraffe skin disease (GSD) recorded in Africa. Using photogrammetric analysis of camera trap images and digital photos of known individual giraffes, I classified GSD lesions into categories of none, mild, moderate, and severe. My study demonstrated that camera trap images presented an informative platform for skin disease ecology studies. In Chapter Two, I evaluated giraffe-lion interactions in Ruaha National Park, where more than 85% of the giraffe population has GSD. The aim of my study was to assess whether GSD may negatively influence the likelihood of giraffes surviving lion predation attempts. Occurrence of lion marks of was higher for adults and males in the giraffe population suggesting that these individuals were more likely to survive lion attacks. I also found that giraffes are an important prey species for lions in Ruaha National Park but GSD severity plays a minor role in influencing likelihood of surviving a lion predation attempt. I further explored the ecological implications of disease ecology on predator-prey interactions. In Chapter Three, I documented how giraffe body parts are acquired and their intended use (consumptive, trophy, or medicative), in Tsavo Conservation Area, southern Kenya. I conducted semi-structured surveys among 331 households to assess correlations between nine socioeconomic factors and use of giraffe parts. I found that giraffe parts mostly had consumptive and trophy uses. Giraffe parts were predominantly acquired through one-time suppliers, opportunistic access, and widely-known markets

Présentation

Version intégrale

Page publiée le 10 décembre 2021