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Accueil du site → Master → Israel → Effect of drought on host parasite relationship in Egyptian broomrape (Phelipanche aegyptiaca) : physiological study

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (2016)

Effect of drought on host parasite relationship in Egyptian broomrape (Phelipanche aegyptiaca) : physiological study

Miao, Chunping

Titre : Effect of drought on host parasite relationship in Egyptian broomrape (Phelipanche aegyptiaca) : physiological study

Auteur : Miao, Chunping

Etablissement de soutenance : Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Grade : Master of Science (MS) 2016

Résumé
Phelipanche aegyptiaca is a root parasitic weed, which is completely dependent on host plants due to lack of chlorophyll and functional roots. It parasitizes and damages many crops at arid and semi arid regions, where water is in shortage. The overall objective of this study was to assess the combined effects of drought stress and P. aegyptiaca infestation on tomato plants. n this study, a split-root system was used to investigate the interaction of P. aegyptiaca and its host, tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum, cv ‘Aiqram’) under drought stress. Tomato plants were grown with root split between two closed pots (0.25 litter each), under the interaction of two factors : P. aegyptiaca infestation (15 mg Kg-1) in three combinations : without infestation, one side infested, or both sides infested, and two water stress levels : partial drying or well irrigated. The second experiment was repeated in 4-litter pots. Physiological and growth parameters of the host plants were measured. Biomass and the number of P. aegyptiaca attachments were recorded at the end of the experiment. Results showed that stomatal conductance, chlorophyll content, and photosynthetic rate of the tomato plants under drought stress were higher than those under broomrape infestation. The stomatal conductance, chlorophyll content, and photosynthetic rate of the tomato plants were lower when they were under stress in both sides than those under stress in one side. There was an increasing trend in stomatal conductance, chlorophyll content, and photosynthetic rate of the full infested tomato plants when drought stress was added. P. aegyptiaca decreased root biomass, length, surface area, and the number of root tips of the tomato plants in both sides of the split-root system, even though one side was out of infestation. The root biomass, root length, root tips number and root surface area of the infested tomato plants increased under drought stress. In conclusion, the damage of broomrape to the tomato plants was more significant than the damage caused by drought stress. The drought stress improved the growth of tomato plants under full infestation. It might be due to a compensation mechanism in the tomato plants

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