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Benha University (2020)

IMPROVING WHEAT PRODUCTION UNDER DROUGHT CONDITIONS USING DIALLEL CROSSING SYSTEM

ABASS, FATHALLAH BORHAMY FATHALLAH

Titre : IMPROVING WHEAT PRODUCTION UNDER DROUGHT CONDITIONS USING DIALLEL CROSSING SYSTEM

Auteur : ABASS, FATHALLAH BORHAMY FATHALLAH

Etablissement de soutenance : Benha University

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Agricultural Science 2020

Résumé
Cereals are the most important crops over the world and wheat is the most important crop within cereals. In developing countries, wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the most important crops as it can be considered as the main source of carbohydrate. Besides being a high carbohydrate food, wheat contains valuable protein, minerals, and vitamins. In food industry, wheat is necessary to produce breads, rolls, crackers, cookies, etc. Furthermore, wheat straw is used for livestock bedding and the green forage may be grazed by livestock or used as hay or silage. Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is the major cereal crop in Egypt as well as several other countries. World average cultivated area of wheat reached 221.731 million hectares in 2017 ; the total production was 751.36* million metric tons, with an average productivity of 3.39* metric tons per hectare. Egypt grew in 2017, 1.25* million hectares that produced 8.10* million metric tons of grains, with an average yield of 6.43* metric tons per hectare. With increasing population, it could hardly satisfy only 55% of local requirements. The increasing gap between production and consumption necessitates increase wheat production in Egypt. To overcome this problem is to increasing the productivity of wheat through an efficient breeding program. By 2025, more than 2.8 billion people in 48 countries will face water stress or water scarcity conditions and Egypt is one of these countries (UNECA). Over the past 50 years, extensive breeding and agronomic efforts has been responsible for boosting cereal yields (Araus and Cairns, 2014).

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Page publiée le 25 mars 2022