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King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals. (Saudi Arabia) (2009)

Stabilization of Eastern Saudi Soils Using Heavy Fuel Oil Fly Ash and Cement Kiln Dust

Abdullah, Gamil

Titre : Stabilization of Eastern Saudi Soils Using Heavy Fuel Oil Fly Ash and Cement Kiln Dust

Auteur : Abdullah, Gamil

Université de soutenance : King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals. (Saudi Arabia)

Grade : Master of Science (MSc) 2009

Résumé
In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, it is anticipated that an increasing amount of oil fuel fly ash (FFA) will be produced from power plants firing crude and heavy fuel oils. Therefore, power plants in the Kingdom may face difficulties concerning the disposal of the produced FFA. Similarly, there are several companies of cement manufacturing all over Saudi Arabia producing thousands of tons of cement daily. These companies face a problem of disposing a large quantity of their cement kiln dust (CKD), which is considered as a waste material. Hence, it would be a noble task if these waste materials are utilized in civil engineering projects. Therefore, this study was conducted with the principal objective of investigating the potential usage of these two waste materials in the stabilization of two indigenous soils (i.e. sand and non-plastic marl). To achieve this objective, the two types of soil were treated with different dosages of FFA and CKD. The mixtures of these stabilized soils were thoroughly evaluated using compaction, CBR, unconfined compression and durability tests. The results of these tests were analyzed and the effect of CKD and FFA on the engineering properties of these mixtures was optimized and compared with the traditionally used stabilizing agent (Portland cement).

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Page publiée le 26 septembre 2010, mise à jour le 3 novembre 2017