Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Master → Autriche → Impact assessment of fences and land use on land-scape permeability for African elephants (Loxodonta africana) south of Etosha National Park, Kunene Region, Namibia

Universität Wien (2020)

Impact assessment of fences and land use on land-scape permeability for African elephants (Loxodonta africana) south of Etosha National Park, Kunene Region, Namibia

Kraus, Ronja Alexandra

Titre : Impact assessment of fences and land use on land-scape permeability for African elephants (Loxodonta africana) south of Etosha National Park, Kunene Region, Namibia

Auteur : Kraus, Ronja Alexandra

Université de soutenance : Universität Wien

Grade : Masterarbeit 2020

Résumé
Where farmers and elephants share a landscape, human-elephant conflicts are common. Fences are popular to prevent elephants from accessing farmland but they restrict the animals’ natural move-ment patterns. In this study, the cumulative impact of both game-proof fences and land manage-ment on the landscape permeability for elephant movement is evaluated for communal and com-mercial farmland and the south-western part of the Etosha National Park in Namibia. An interdisciplinary approach served to understand the local human-elephant interactions and to assess the impediment of landscape connectivity, driven by socio-economic activities and natural landscape features. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with freehold farmers and experts. Participatory mapping provided for the location of fences and information on farm management while GPS records of seven collared elephants were used to investigate habitat preferences. Least-cost analysis was used to evaluate the connectivity between identified areas of elephant preference. The interview results suggest that in this area, elephant-farmer interactions may be seen as a conflict over natural resources. The geospatial data analysis revealed that game-proof boundary fences combined with a certain land management do not inhibit connectivity completely but rather shift corridors and potential conflicts locally. This suggests that individual and uncoordinated measures are unlikely to succeed in long-term conflict mitigation. A coordinated landscape-wide approach to align elephant movement requirements and human economic activities, based on local stakeholder and (scientific) expert knowledge, might be an alternative to provide a peaceful coexistence between elephants and humans.

Présentation

Page publiée le 9 mars 2022