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Acharya N G Ranga Agricultural University, Guntur (2015)

WATERSHED MODELLING ON VARIABILITY OF RUNOFF AND GROUND WATER POTENTIALS

RAKESH, G

Titre : WATERSHED MODELLING ON VARIABILITY OF RUNOFF AND GROUND WATER POTENTIALS

Auteur : RAKESH, G

Université de soutenance : Acharya N G Ranga Agricultural University, Guntur

Grade : Master of Technology in Agricultural Engineering 2015

Résumé
Water resources of a country constitute one of its vital assets. India receives annual precipitation of about 4000 km3 and India’s average annual surface run-off generated by rainfall and snowmelt is estimated to be about 1869 billion cubic meters (BCM) (Chatterjee, 2014). However, it is estimated that only about 690 BCM or 37% of the surface water resources can actually be mobilized. The average annual rainfall in India is about 1170 mm. This is considerable variation in rainfall both temporarily and spatially. Possible changes in rainfall patterns in the coming decade, global warming and climate change and other predicted or observed long-term trends on water availability could affect India’s water resources. India’s rechargeable annual groundwater potential has been assessed at around 431 BCM in aggregate terms. On an all India basis it is estimated that about 30 per cent of the groundwater potential has been tapped for irrigation and domestic use. The regional situation is very much different and large parts of India have already exploited almost all of their dynamic recharge. Haryana and Punjab have exploited about 94 per cent of their groundwater resources. The total water resources (surface water and groundwater) of Andhra Pradesh are estimated to be about 108 BCM (about 78 BCM from surface water, primarily from the Godavari and Krishna rivers), of which nearly 65 BCM are currently utilized (0.6 BCM for drinking, 64 BCM for irrigation, 0.3 BCM for industry and 0.3 BCM for power generation) (Rakesh et al., 2005). Most of the water (about 92%) is currently supplied for irrigation, although other needs are expected to grow in the future. The current trends of increase in water supply from all users will outstrip available supplies significantly by 2025.

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