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Accueil du site → Doctorat → Italie → Development of a continuous small-rearing technique on natural host for the olive fruit fly Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) and study on volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by Olea europaea L. as potential host allelochemics

Università degli Studi della Tuscia (2011)

Development of a continuous small-rearing technique on natural host for the olive fruit fly Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) and study on volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by Olea europaea L. as potential host allelochemics

Baratella, Valentina

Titre : Development of a continuous small-rearing technique on natural host for the olive fruit fly Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) and study on volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by Olea europaea L. as potential host allelochemics

Messa a punto di un metodo di allevamento in continuo su piccola scala per la mosca delle olive Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) e studio su composti organici volatili (VOCs) emessi da Olea europaea L. come potenziali allelochimici

Auteur : Baratella, Valentina

Université de soutenance : Università degli Studi della Tuscia

Grade : Dottorato di ricerca in Protezione delle piante 2011

Résumé partiel
The olive fruit flies Bactrocera oleae (Rossi), as most of the Tephritidae species (“true fruit flies”), is a pest of great economic importance. It’s among the most serious pests of Olea europaea L. in the Mediterranean Basin and in olive growing regions worldwide. Longstanding control programmes as well as current research efforts emphasize the development of long-term management practices, focusing on classical biological control for sustainable management. As part of a classical biological control programme, several attempts have been done in the past in order to rear olive fly ex-situ. Undue efforts are often directed toward producing the largest possible number of flies at the least possible cost, but the flies produced on artificial diets or on factitious hosts may not be effective in carrying out the mission for which they were intended. In the case of B. oleae, genetic changes seem to occur when olive flies are reared on artificial diet causing adverse effect on their performances and fitness if compared to wild individuals. For this reason, researchers are now oriented to obtain laboratory colonies maintaining them on their natural host : developing rearing protocols for olive fruit fly on its natural host would allow bioecological and behavioural studies and successful field-releases of olive fruit fly biological control agents. The present study establishes fundamental guidelines for a small-scale and cost-effective rearing of B. oleae, for the first time successfully culturing year-round the olive fruit fly on its natural host basing upon the continual availability of fresh olive fruits, suitable to oviposit. In line with IPM and biological management purposes, ending the use of non-selective long-lasting poisons and beginning the use of insects attractants, not just pheromones, could potentially become a powerful management tool, interfering with plant and insects at vulnerable steps. At this regard, the second purpose of the present study was the characterization of the broadest possible range of volatile compounds and to investigate the possible changing trends of biological volatile emissions during development stages. The return of feral olive fly populations to the olive groves after the first abundant summer rains it must certainly be due to volatile compounds emitted by the plants and active on the olive fly. These results involve that host-plant odours play the fundamental ecological role of olfactory attractants and oviposition stimulants interacting with B. oleae.

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