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University of New South Wales (UNSW) 2021

Woodland structure and function in response to increasing aridity

Ding, Jingyi

Titre : Woodland structure and function in response to increasing aridity

Auteur : Ding, Jingyi

Université de soutenance : University of New South Wales (UNSW)

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) 2021

Résumé partiel
Woodlands, characterised by a matrix of trees, shrubs and open interspaces, are important biomes on Earth. Woodlands support a number of important ecosystem functions such as primary production, carbon fixation and nutrient cycling, and provide multiple ecosystem services that are essential for human livelihoods. Woodland structure and function are regulated by both large-scale shifts in climate, and smaller-scale variation in species interactions, resource availability and land management. Predicted changes in climate are expected to increase dryness and intensify management activities (e.g., grazing, plant removal), imposing substantial challenges on the functioning of woodlands and their dependent biota. Exploring how woodlands change across a climatic (aridity) gradient and among different management practices is essential for understanding how they adapt to drier climates and intensified woodland management, and to predict the ecological consequences of increasing aridity on their functions. This thesis examines the response of woodland structure and function to increasing aridity and woody plant removal, and the impact of biotic (e.g., plant traits, competition, grazing) and abiotic (e.g., climate, soil) drivers at both microsite and sub-continental scales, based on meta-analysis and field survey

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Page publiée le 5 avril 2022