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University of KwaZulu-Natal (2021)

A systematic review and meta-analysis of solar technology impacts on rural households : experiences from the Global South.

Kanniah, Deanntha

Titre : A systematic review and meta-analysis of solar technology impacts on rural households : experiences from the Global South.

Auteur : Kanniah, Deanntha

Université de soutenance : University of KwaZulu-Natal

Grade : Master of Science (MS) in Environmental Science 2021

Résumé partiel
Renewable energy technologies are widely prescribed to address multiple developmental needs, especially in developing contexts. As reflected in the growing body of literature, these devices and energy sources can generate socio-economic and environmental benefits and offer relatively rapid transitions to more sustainable practices. In this regard, it is essential to understand and identify the links among their impacts at a household and community level. This study aimed to critically examine how the impacts of solar technologies have been examined and measured at the household level, focusing on low-income and rural communities across the Global South. This review systematically focuses on research within a specified temporal range, 1999 to 2019, concerning the UNDG’s definition of impact and the sustainable livelihood’s theoretical framework. The motivation for this review is to establish whether research of the developing contexts have been able to respond to the multi-dimensionality of energy access and determine whether research has been a reflection of the changing energy narratives on energy needs. In addition, this review examines how and whether the impacts of solar energy technologies (SETs) are examined in relation to specific livelihood outcomes. Following the PRISMA 2009 and 2020 guideline for systematic reviews, the Web of Science, Google Scholar, and WorldCat databases were used. The initial search yielded (n=175187), which was later reduced to a total of n=56 cases that met the geographic, temporal, and contentrelated criteria. It was found that over the temporal range, Global South countries contributed a significantly lower number of published research compared to the global north countries. Over time, progressive trends in the proportion, dissemination and development of different SET’s could be identified as literature was found to have investigated several types of SETs across 24 different Global South countries using eight different analyses dominated by mixedmethod approaches and field survey methods.

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