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University of Nairobi (2021)

Appraisal of the Climate Change Resilience of a Pastoral Socialecological System- a Case Study of the Maasai Community in Kajiado County, Kenya

Kaoga, James O

Titre : Appraisal of the Climate Change Resilience of a Pastoral Socialecological System- a Case Study of the Maasai Community in Kajiado County, Kenya

Auteur : Kaoga, James O

Université de soutenance : University of Nairobi

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Climate Change and Adaptation 2021

Résumé partiel
Kajiado County is largely Arid and Semi-Arid Lands (ASALs). The Maasai pastoralists, who are the predominant community inhabiting the County, have been faced with persistent droughts leading up to 30 per cent loss of their livestock annually and this is attributed to climate-related disasters. The situation has been aggravated by the land use transformation since what was formerly communal land has been converted to private holding which is not in harmony with the traditional seasonal movement of livestock. This has contributed to the rampant food insecurity in the county. To address this gap, the research investigated the impacts of climate change and landuse changes on the pastoral Social-Ecological System in Kajiado County. The specific objectives of the study were : to determine historical climate trend and its impacts on pastoral livelihoods, to evaluate the pastoral Socio-Ecological System and its influence on pastoralists’ livelihood and lastly, to determine adaptation strategies to enhance the resilience of the pastoral Socio-Ecological System to climate change and land-use transformation. The study used a mixed-method design which involved qualitative and quantitative data. Primary datasets consisted of 195 questionnaires for Household survey, 18 Key Informant Interviews and 8 Focus Group Discussions. These tools were complemented with secondary datasets, which consisted of Climate Hazards Group Infra- Red Precipitation with Stations (CHIRPS) precipitation data from 1983 to 2014, monthly temperature for the period 1970 to 2014 from Kenya Meteorological Department and Landsat 8, 5 and 4. The 1987, 2000 and 2015 epochs were sourced from www.glovis.usgs.org. The datasets at various points were analysed using time series, t-test, frequencies, scores and themes. The study revealed declining annual rainfall trend and unreliability of seasonal precipitation patterns which were compounded with rising temperatures (Tmax and Tmin). Additionally, changes in land use patterns were observed within the landscape with the forested land, grassland, riverine, shrubland, waterbody, bare area, built-up area, wetland and cropland having undergone changes in their sizes

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