Informations et ressources scientifiques
sur le développement des zones arides et semi-arides

Accueil du site → Master → Canada → Impacts Of Climate Change On Food Security And Smallholder Livelihoods In Northern Ghana

The University of Western Ontario (2021)

Impacts Of Climate Change On Food Security And Smallholder Livelihoods In Northern Ghana

Mohammed, Kamaldeen

Titre : Impacts Of Climate Change On Food Security And Smallholder Livelihoods In Northern Ghana

Auteur : Mohammed, Kamaldeen

Université de soutenance : The University of Western Ontario

Grade : Master of Arts (MA) 2021

Résumé
Climate change and food insecurity threaten the livelihoods of smallholder communities in the Global South. In the Ghanaian context, climate change and food insecurity are particularly crucial challenges in the northern regions, where most people are engaged in diverse activities in the agricultural sector. Despite tremendous efforts to curtail food insecurity and climate change vulnerability of smallholder households in northern Ghana, food insecurity and climate change remain pervasive in the region, indicating that smallholder adaptive capacities and resilience to the impacts of climate change are not commensurate with the severity of the problems. Emerging literature has indicated that livelihood diversification strategies and collective household decision-making can potentially moderate the effects of climate change. Yet in the Upper West Region (UWR) of Ghana, we know little about these important links. Therefore, this study draws data from a cross-sectional survey (n=1100) in the UWR to examine smallholder livelihoods and food security situation in the contexts of climate change.

First, the study examined the role of livelihood diversification strategies in households’ resilience to climate change. Results from the logistic regression revealed that smallholder households that practiced only farm diversification (OR = 3.95 ; p ≤ 0.05) and a combination of both farm and non-farm diversification (OR = 5.77 ; p ≤ 0.01) had significantly higher odds of reporting stronger resilience to climate change compared to those who did not employ any diversification strategy. Second, the study examined the relationship between intra-household decision-making arrangements and food security. The regression results indicated that households that practiced joint decision-making (OR = 1.71 ; p≤0.001) had significantly higher odds of being food secure than households that practiced sole patriarchal decision-making. The findings from this study point to the need for agricultural policies to harness the synergies between farm and non-farm livelihood activities as complementary climate change risk-spreading strategies. Also, this study reinforces that policies seeking to address food insecurity and other socio-economic challenges in northern Ghana must focus on the interdependence and complementarity of men and women in household food security decision-making.

Présentation

Version intégrale (3,6 Mb)

Page publiée le 17 mai 2022