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University of Cape Town. (2020)

The IUCN red list for ecosystems : how does it compare to South Africa’s approach to listing threatened ecosystems ?

Monyeki, Maphale Stella

Titre : The IUCN red list for ecosystems : how does it compare to South Africa’s approach to listing threatened ecosystems ?

Auteur : Monyeki, Maphale Stella

Université de soutenance : University of Cape Town.

Grade : Master of Science Statistics in Ecology, Environment and Conservation 2020

Résumé partiel
The publication of the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Ecosystems (RLE) standards is an important development that has received broad acceptance globally. More than 100 countries across the globe including South Africa and Myanmar have adopted the IUCN RLE standards as their national framework for assessing the risk of ecosystem collapse. The strongest motivations for the alignment include : (i) elimination of confusion and reducing the administrative burden for maintaining multiple lists of threatened ecosystems, (ii) increased legitimacy of the ecosystem threat status assessment by basing them on a body of sound scientific literature, (iii) comparable assessments across different environments and countries across the globe, (iv) for the threatened national ecosystems to be recorded under the IUCN RLE registry. Furthermore, the IUCN Red List makes it easier for countries to secure funding from international donors to achieve national biodiversity conservation objectives, and address knowledge and data gaps through focused research. The IUCN RLE standards only became available after many countries including South Africa and Australia each independently tailor-developed national indicators or standards for assessing threats to ecosystems. The Ecosystem Threat statuses (ETS) standards are developed to aid biodiversity monitoring efforts, and many have progressed into the legislated national list of the threatened ecosystems. In South Africa, the gazetted list of threatened ecosystems is ratified to inform policy development and land-use planning tools that mainstream biodiversity considerations into economic development activities. Considering the strong links between the gazetted list of threatened ecosystems and many of the policy and spatial planning tools, the change and/or update to the IUCN RLE standards may disrupt conservation and land-use plans

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Page publiée le 18 juin 2022