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University of Venda (2019)

Developing community-informed technology for harvesting rainwater for domestic use in a semi-arid area of South Africa

Nyamukondiwa, Pertina

Titre : Developing community-informed technology for harvesting rainwater for domestic use in a semi-arid area of South Africa

Auteur : Nyamukondiwa, Pertina

Université de soutenance : University of Venda

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) in Rural Development 2019

Résumé partiel
Approximately, 780 million of people in the world lack access to safe water for domestic use. Out of these, 37 % are found in sub-Saharan Africa. Because of the negative impact of climate variability and change, scarcity of water is likely to continue worsening. Although semi-arid areas experience water shortages, they receive limited amounts of rainfall. Rainwater might help alleviate temporal water shortages. However, rainwater is rarely harvested for use when most needed. The PhD in Rural Development thesis research was carried out in Mabayeni village, which falls under Ward 35 of Collins Chabane Local Municipality in Limpopo Province of South Africa. It was designed to develop a grassroots community-informed prototype for a technology that could be used to harvest rainwater for domestic use. A series of interrelated studies with the following specific objectives underpinned the research : (1) To determine the extent of water scarcity ; (2) To identify strategies households used to cope with inadequate availability of water for domestic use ; (3) To document the rainwater harvesting techniques rural households used ; (4) To compare the features of rainwater harvesting technology that people of different age groups preferred ; (5) To develop community-preferred prototypes of rainwater harvesting technology with the best potential to increase access to water for domestic use ; and (6) To evaluate the community-preferred prototypes of rainwater harvesting technology. Partly, the study was conducted as a follow-up to a Master’s research study on climate change carried out in 2014 in Mabayeni village. In the 2014 study, it was revealed that water scarcity was a major result of climate change in the area. In addition, Mabayeni was perceived as the driest compared to other villages in the ward. The Cresswell (2013) explanatory sequential mixed method design guided the study. Multi-stage sampling was followed to select respondents. This entailed categorizing respondents first dividing them by age and gender. Respondents were placed in the following clusters : children (boys and girls), youth (male and female), adult (men and women), and the elderly. This was done in order to ensure that there was triangulation of data sources.

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