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Durban University of Technology (DUT) 2021

Environmental vulnerability and the economic implications of climate change for tourism development in the Central Drakensberg Region [CDR] of KwaZulu-Natal

Ngxongo, Nduduzo Andrias

Titre : Environmental vulnerability and the economic implications of climate change for tourism development in the Central Drakensberg Region [CDR] of KwaZulu-Natal

Auteur : Ngxongo, Nduduzo Andrias

Université de soutenance : Durban University of Technology (DUT)

Grade : Doctor of Philosophy in Hospitality and Tourism 2021

Résumé partiel
In spite of the substantial amount of research that has been conducted in the last decade, misconceptions about the impacts particularly at a local level still abound. This study aimed to determine the extent to which climate change affected the environmental and economic facets of the Central Drakensberg Region [CDR] and the potential impacts these changes have had on the tourism industry. The tourism industry and the activities associated with it are highly weather-dependent and by extension, climate-dependent. Hence in recent times, there has been a growing concern over the impacts of climate change on the development of tourism. In South Africa, climate change is becoming more evident, causing flooding and extreme temperature and weather patterns. Likewise, Africa is widely considered to be highly vulnerable to climate change mainly because of its strong economic dependency on climate-related activities, destitute climate literacy and low adaptive capacity. The CDR, which is an increasingly popular tourist destination, is particularly vulnerable to the long-term impacts of climate change. METHODOLOGY : The spatial setting of this research was the CDR, located in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN). The study fused two sampling techniques under the auspices of the non-probability sample method, namely : purposive and convenience sampling. The study’s target population was N=450, thus a sample size of n=350 was determined appropriate. The respondents were categorized into two groups : namely experts [local municipality and tourism authorities] and stakeholders [tourists and/or visitors]. A quantitative research approach was employed with an exploratory paradigm design. The data collected was analysed using the latest Statistical Package for the Social Science (Version 25.0) at the time.

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