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Accueil du site → Master → Ethiopie → IMPACT OF SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION STRUCTURES ON HOUSEHOLDS’ FOOD SECURITY : THE CASE OF WEST AND EAST BELESA WOREDAS, CENTRAL GONDAR ZONE, AMHARA REGION, ETHIOPIA.

Bahir Dar University (2020)

IMPACT OF SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION STRUCTURES ON HOUSEHOLDS’ FOOD SECURITY : THE CASE OF WEST AND EAST BELESA WOREDAS, CENTRAL GONDAR ZONE, AMHARA REGION, ETHIOPIA.

Mehariw Worku

Titre : IMPACT OF SOIL AND WATER CONSERVATION STRUCTURES ON HOUSEHOLDS’ FOOD SECURITY : THE CASE OF WEST AND EAST BELESA WOREDAS, CENTRAL GONDAR ZONE, AMHARA REGION, ETHIOPIA.

Auteur : Mehariw Worku

Université de soutenance : Bahir Dar University

Grade : Master of Science (MS) 2020

Résumé
Although the government of Ethiopia and non-governmental organizations have invested substantial resources in promoting soil and water conservation practices (SWC) to improve environmental conditions ; ensure sustainable and increased agricultural production, and thus improve food security, there is no enough study dealing with the impact of SWC structures on food security. This study’s major aim was to analyze the impact of SWC structures on households’ food security in the semi-arid areas of Belesa. Specifically, the study assessed onfarm adoption of SWC structures and its impact on households’ food security measured in households’ dietary diversity score (HDDS), food consumption score (FCS), food insecurity experience scale (FIES), and food security scale(FSS). Data was generated from 546 households using a multi-stage sampling technique from four sample kebeles in East and West Belesa Woredas. The study used both primary and secondary data. Descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and econometric models were used to analyze the data collected. A binary probit model and an endogenous switching regression (ESR) model were employed to analyze the determinants of on-farm adoption of SWC structures and its’ impact on food security respectively. The survey result shows that 52.01% of the sample households adopted SWC structures on their farm. Age of the household head, household size, frequency of SWC training, average plot area, the proportion of owned plots, and proportion of lower position plots from watersheds had a significant positive effect on the adoption of SWC structures. However, the amount of non-farm income, average plot to home distance, and proportion of flat-sloped plots affected the adoption of SWC structures negatively. The ESR model result shows, the HDDS and the FCS of adopters increased by 7.316 and 18.707 points due to adopting SWC structures. Besides, the FSS and FIES of adopters decreased by 4.462 and 0.221 points due to adopting SWC structures. For non-adopters, the HDDS and the FCS could be increased by 0.631 and 4.016 points if they had adopted SWC structures. Furthermore, the FSS and FIES could be decreased by 0.322 and 0.527 points if they had adopted SWC structures. SWC structures are contributing to the improvement of the food security of the households. Policymakers, extension agents, Woreda, and kebele level agricultural offices should consider the findings of the study and come with better approaches and solutions to improve the adoption of SWC structure

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Page publiée le 16 juin 2022